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Routing a Worktop

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Routing a Worktop

Postby Woodster » 01 Aug 2020, 07:38

We are getting a new Hob and it’s 5mm bigger all round than the old one. I therefore need to trim 2.5mm off the worktop opening L & R and 2.5mm front and back. I would normally clamp a guide and run the router along it but I’ve got nothing to clamp it to. I’ve got some double sided tape so I could temporarily stick a strip of plywood down but I’m a bit concerned it could slip. Anyone got any other ideas?
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Re: Routing a Worktop

Postby 9fingers » 01 Aug 2020, 08:07

Make a full 4 sided template from ply/mdf/osb etc
Or use a rebating bit with 2.5 mm offset between cutter and bearing ( fine tune the offset with tape wound round the bearing if needed)
Cut rebate half depth to the new size
Then use a trim bearing guided cutter to copy cut the remains of the of the aperture to full depth.
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Re: Routing a Worktop

Postby Malc2098 » 01 Aug 2020, 09:00

An alternative to double sided tape could be strong masking tape stuck to both worktop and to straight edge guide and superglue the outside of the tapes together. Try it out first and test for movement. If it moves, forget it and go for Bob's.
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Re: Routing a Worktop

Postby Woodster » 01 Aug 2020, 10:58

I don’t have enough material to hand for a full four sided template. I have already considered that I could fix four suitable strips together for a similar effect. The problem of holding it in place remains although I could use some clamps at the front. I’ll have to google “rebating” bit but not sure I can get one in time! :lol:
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Re: Routing a Worktop

Postby Woodbloke » 01 Aug 2020, 11:22

I did this a while back when we had our new hob and had to take off about the same amount. I couldn't use a router for the same reason so I got out some rasps and gnawed the waste away with them. It was messy and inaccurate but it didn't take too long to get the new hob to drop in
Other than that, you could always use the router freehand and nibble away the excess assuming it was marked out in pencil - Rob
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Re: Routing a Worktop

Postby Woodster » 01 Aug 2020, 11:52

I can’t seem to find my Elu Router at the moment but I did buy a Katsu last year for use on my lathe and found this in the box. Never used anything like it before. I think it’s designed for curves but could it be used?


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Re: Routing a Worktop

Postby Malc2098 » 01 Aug 2020, 12:05

I used this on my router tower to rout the binding channels on the edges of the guitar body.

Yes, it can be used. The roller has to be below the bottom of the cutter and it will be following the previous aperture of your sink, so you should clear off any gunge and imperfections.

The router should also address a 90 degree aspect to the workpiece otherwise the horizontal cut will be less than you set the roller at.

But, it will only work so long as you have enough of the exiting aperture for the roller to follow. Any left over can then be removed with a bearing following cutter.
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Re: Routing a Worktop

Postby Andyp » 01 Aug 2020, 12:40

Is 2.5mm too small to cut off with a jigsaw, freehand?
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Re: Routing a Worktop

Postby Woodster » 01 Aug 2020, 13:04

Sounds like a plan Malcolm. ;) I’ve just checked and I do have a bearing follower cutter.
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Re: Routing a Worktop

Postby RogerS » 01 Aug 2020, 13:28

Andyp wrote:Is 2.5mm too small to cut off with a jigsaw, freehand?


I think so. Trouble with some jigsaw/blades is that they go off the vertical.

Could you not clamp a straight edge at either end...route the middle portion. Then move one end clamp to the middle. Finish off the end that is now free of clamps. Then reverse the operation for the other end.
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Re: Routing a Worktop

Postby Woodster » 01 Aug 2020, 21:36

I have a large square that could be used (with some ply) for the L & R cuts as I can clamp it to the work top at the front edge. If I can take 5mm off the back cut that should be straightforward if the wall is reasonably square.
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Re: Routing a Worktop

Postby RogerS » 01 Aug 2020, 21:40

Woodster wrote:I have a large square that could be used (with some ply) for the L & R cuts as I can clamp it to the work top at the front edge. If I can take 5mm off the back cut that should be straightforward if the wall is reasonably square.


If you do, double-clamp the ply and/or have another piece of anything also clamped as a backup by the side of the first piece. You'd be surprised at the leverage you can exert on a piece of material that is only clamped at one end. Then factor in the inherent slippiness of worktops etc. DAMHIKT
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Re: Routing a Worktop

Postby RogerM » 03 Aug 2020, 19:34

Woodster wrote:I can’t seem to find my Elu Router at the moment but I did buy a Katsu last year for use on my lathe and found this in the box. Never used anything like it before. I think it’s designed for curves but could it be used?


5CF51C75-1598-4666-9188-5CB4C28A38E2.jpeg


That's just like my Bosch trim router holder. You just need a straight bit, keep it clear of the roller, and adjust the roller to take off 2.5mm. Mind you, I think your first idea also has legs. If you use a couple of strips of double-sided tape, and clamp the guide at the front, I reckon it'll never move. Your main problem will be getting it off afterwards! Sh1t to a blanket and all that.
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Re: Routing a Worktop

Postby Woodster » Yesterday, 19:02

Job done. When the hob arrived I tried it in the opening and it just fit. Problem was the monkey that originally cut the opening didn’t manage to get it anywhere even remotely square. I trimmed up the opening with a router guided by a large square clamped to the worktop. Some final cuts were done with a multi tool.

I think a trained Beaver could have done a better job than the original kitchen fitter. :lol:
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