It is currently 18 Dec 2017, 23:29

Cupboard doors – renovation

This forum is for any general questions, queries or plain old chinwaggery on Woody stuff in general.

Cupboard doors – renovation

Postby Phil » 04 Dec 2016, 09:20

Cupboard doors – renovation

Eldest son and DIL bought an ‘old’ house, about 45 years old, that requires some serious TLC.
Fairly large with 4 bedrooms.

The previous owners, elderly couple, did no maintenance, so the house really looks shabby inside and outside.

The built in cupboards in the bedrooms and passage have very thick veneered doors (hollow core) which were installed badly and also covered with a thick layer of varnish or PU.

The veneer is Mahogany which on the outside of the door has faded to a nice light colour, the inside panel still very dark. Important to remember for filler and stain colour.

The hinge recess on the doors are either too deep or too shallow. They must have used a blunt screwdriver to cut them.

When you push the door closed, it jumps back due to bad hinge installation.

When the frames for the built in cupboards were painted, the edges of the doors also got paint. No care or finesse.


Digressing – bathroom 2 shower door.

The foot plate was installed the wrong way around, so when you showered the water ran out onto the floor (for 40 years?!)

When they installed it they did not realise you can turn it the other way and just change the fixed panel to the other side and the other panels slide to the other side.

I spent a Saturday dismantling this lot and cleaning off 40-year-gunge.

The footplate when I eventually got it out was tiled in! Turning it around was not an issue. I reinstalled filling the gap with silicone sealer and pop riveted the frame back in.

There is only a ‘very slight’ drip on one corner, but it will have to do till they renovate the bathroom.


Ok, back to the cupboard doors.

Bedroom 4 were the first doors he took off.
Three large and three small doors.

You learn from your mistakes.

1) Assess the door closed and mark where edges have to be trimmed for a better fit.

2) Mark the flipping hinges!!! Which door, which position. He only realised this when fitting back the doors after I had finished with them.

The three large doors are quite heavy and bulky to handle. Transporting the doors is not a problem as I have an NP200 pickup.

The easiest way to do the ‘renovation’ is on a nice large flat surface – enter the fold up trestle table, which takes up my half of the garage. I now park outside.

The work involved is quite simple and messy.
The tools are laid out on the back of the table.

Makita third sheet sander for 220grit
Makita half sheet sander for 180 grit
Ryobi belt sander with 100 grit for top, bottom and hinge sides
2 putty knives for filler
2 G-clamps and pads (to stop the door moving around)
2 Sash clamps for loose edges
Filler – Mahogany for front and dark Oak for back
Packet of Stanley blades
Teak stain – colour closest to the Mahogany on the outside
Walnut stain – colour closest to the Mahogany on the inside
Large packet of 180 and 220 grit paper & sanding block
Steel ruler – long & short
Marking pen – fine point
Stanley knife to cut the sandpaper
Hearing protection! (belt sander)

Process:-
Drill out screws stuck in hinges, plug hole with a dowel or glue in new larger plug – I used some scrap Beech.

This is the door with the hinge that required drilling out.

Image

Glue and clamp any loose side strips. (sash clamps)

Image

Mark the edges, on the hinge side, that need to be trimmed for a better fit. This is where the belt sander, as opposed to a planer, is used.
So easy to sand off 1mm and also clean up the top and bottom edges.

The hinge is then checked for unevenness/too deep a fit.
A bit of chisel work and some filler sorts out any problems.

Now to the surface of the door - examine the surface for dings and scratches. This is where my friend Stanley-the-blade is used to ‘soften’ the scratch or ding.

Next up the big Makita with 180 grit.
When I bought the Makita it did not have a hole-maker and they did not stock one, so next best thing was make one.

Image

A bit crude, but it works. Place the paper face up, put the peg board on top and press.
Voila! One half holy sheet.
It also did not come with a dust bag, but the bag from the smaller Makita fits of.

Some elbow and back movement with the sander up and down the door until the whole surface has been sanded. Remember, no pressure, the sander will do its thing.

A wipe off with a damp cloth, and when dry, all the ‘hollow’ areas are visible. These are then tackled by hand sanding.

Now to address all the screw holes as well as the lock and handle holes.
The screw holes are easy, clean them out with the vac and press some filler in.

For the lock/key hole I stuff some tissue in about 15mm down, this gets removed when I do the other side. Then gradually start back filling with filler until level.

Stanley-the-blade is again used to check the scratches and dings, and also a bit of hand sanding.

Next up is the small Makita with 220 grit. This comes with its hole maker, fit the paper on the sander, apply the hole maker, press down and you are A-for-away.

Image

After sanding wipe dust off with a damp cloth.

Again Stanley and sandpaper by hand.
Double check the screw holes and the lock/key hole to ensure they are level with the surface.

Snags – where the handles and locks are removed from the face of the door, and any stickers stuck on, the colour of the veneer remained dark.
No amount of sanding or whatever lightens it up.

This is not too serious where the handles were, as the new handle hides the marks.
However the one door had a round sticker on it which will be very visible once the door has been sprayed. They can maybe hang a mirror on that door?

Image

Here are 2 of the doors for bedroom 4 that I completed some time ago. They are ready for spraying, will post pics when completed and installed.

Image

Thank you for reading

Cheers
Phil
Support courage where there is fear, foster agreement where there is conflict and inspire hope where there is despair – Nelson Mandela
User avatar
Phil
Old Oak
 
Posts: 1392
Joined: 23 Jul 2014, 05:11
Location: Southern Africa 0054
Name: Phil

Re: Cupboard doors – renovation

Postby Rod » 04 Dec 2016, 13:07

That looks like a lot of hard work - what fathers will do for daughters
I like the homemade hole punch.
My daughter had some work done a few years ago by a local builder including a new upstairs bathroom. Recently the shower started leaking through the ceiling. On investigation they found that the tiles had been stuck directly onto ordinary plasterboard which had rotted and gone mouldy! The builder supposedly had a good reputation but not anymore

Rod
User avatar
Rod
Old Oak
 
Posts: 3001
Joined: 21 Jul 2014, 21:34
Location: Winchester, Hampshire
Name:

Re: Cupboard doors – renovation

Postby Malc2098 » 05 Dec 2016, 18:28

Nicely elegant solution to make the holes!
Malcolm
User avatar
Malc2098
Old Oak
 
Posts: 1639
Joined: 03 Jul 2016, 11:10
Location: Tiverton
Name: Malcolm

Re: Cupboard doors – renovation

Postby Phil » 06 Dec 2016, 07:40

Rod wrote:That looks like a lot of hard work - what fathers will do for daughters

Rod



This is for eldest son and DIL - he was going to do the sanding himself with a small Skil sander.
I offered and it was the right opportunity to buy a belt sander 8-)


Rod wrote:I like the homemade hole punch.

Rod



Malc2098 wrote:Nicely elegant solution to make the holes!


It works "ok" not quite 100% lined up to the holes. When I can find a round-tuit I will either fiddle it right or just make a new one.
Because the holes don't line up 100%, the dust extraction does not work the way it should.

He was going to buy a Makita one-third sander, so being a good parent, I gave him mine. :D

And went and bought a new one. 8-) 8-)
Support courage where there is fear, foster agreement where there is conflict and inspire hope where there is despair – Nelson Mandela
User avatar
Phil
Old Oak
 
Posts: 1392
Joined: 23 Jul 2014, 05:11
Location: Southern Africa 0054
Name: Phil

Re: Cupboard doors – renovation

Postby Phil » 11 Dec 2016, 10:06

The total project is:-

Bedroom 1 – zero doors. The cupboards were broken out to enlarge the bathroom and new cupboards will be installed. Melamine on PB.

Bedrooms 2, 3 and 4 all have 3 large doors and 3 small doors.

Passage - 2 large and 2 small doors. These doors are 140mm wider than the bedroom doors, and heavier.

Study – can’t remember, could be 2 large & 2 small.

These are the 3 small doors at the top of the bedroom cupboards.

Image

Same process as the big doors, just easier to handle.

Current status:-

Bedroom 2 – in progress
Bedroom 3 – doors still to be taken off
Bedroom 4 – completed
Passage – in progress

The inside of the cupboards were finished off with Pine boards about 18mm thick, which were all ripped out.


Cheers
Phil
Support courage where there is fear, foster agreement where there is conflict and inspire hope where there is despair – Nelson Mandela
User avatar
Phil
Old Oak
 
Posts: 1392
Joined: 23 Jul 2014, 05:11
Location: Southern Africa 0054
Name: Phil

Re: Cupboard doors – renovation

Postby Phil » 02 Jan 2017, 06:43

The door with the mark on it from a sticker.

Image

The final decision reached during the week was to ditch it. (great pity as both doors were completed ready for spraying)

So I went and fetched another set of doors that were removed from bedroom 1.

Another decision – take the left and right doors so that the colours/shade are fairly close.

Condition looks ok, just one screw to drill out and plug the hole.

Cheers
Phil
Support courage where there is fear, foster agreement where there is conflict and inspire hope where there is despair – Nelson Mandela
User avatar
Phil
Old Oak
 
Posts: 1392
Joined: 23 Jul 2014, 05:11
Location: Southern Africa 0054
Name: Phil

Re: Cupboard doors – renovation

Postby Phil » 03 Feb 2017, 11:50

The final finish will be a clear matt PU.
This will be applied with a spray gun.

Big question – where to do it?

The compressor is at his house and the rest of the kit in my garage.

Easy decision – his garage. Rather have all the mess there, especially the fine overspray dust. :D
Also the completed doors don’t have to then be transported.

I tackled this the same way as the kitchen cupboard doors at the old house.

Place cardboard boxes on the floor to lay the doors onto.
They need to be spaced so that you can get in between with the pipe and the compressor.

All 6 doors were done at once, easier for cleaning the gun.

My spray gun is a top feed unit, plastic cup so you can see the level, and does not splutter and spit when running dry.

Unless you do this kind of work regularly, you tend to forget minor things – like don’t shake it, there are drops that come out from the breather hole and splatter onto the nicely sprayed surface!

The doors get three coats, with an 800 grit rub between each coat.

Final inspection outside in sunlight showed like a freckle on the surface. Once in the house, not noticeable at all.

Discussed this ‘freckle’ with one of the chaps at work who sprays cars. He says its fine bits of residue in the PU from maybe some skin forming.
Solution is to place a filter over the cup and then fill it up.

I will buy a filter before I do the next lot of spraying.

Cheers
Phil
Support courage where there is fear, foster agreement where there is conflict and inspire hope where there is despair – Nelson Mandela
User avatar
Phil
Old Oak
 
Posts: 1392
Joined: 23 Jul 2014, 05:11
Location: Southern Africa 0054
Name: Phil

Re: Cupboard doors – renovation

Postby Phil » 19 Feb 2017, 12:11

These are bedroom 4 doors completed and fitted.

All the sanding marks and patches disappear when sprayed.

Image

The new handles are the medium size barrel handles.

On the top doors the handles were placed close to the bottom, so it’s easier to open the door.

This is what the inside of the cupboards looked like (one of the better ones)

Image


He measured and fitted the insides himself, melamine on PB. The larger hardware stores do cut to size and edging per your measurements.


Image


Image


Image


Cheers
Phil
Support courage where there is fear, foster agreement where there is conflict and inspire hope where there is despair – Nelson Mandela
User avatar
Phil
Old Oak
 
Posts: 1392
Joined: 23 Jul 2014, 05:11
Location: Southern Africa 0054
Name: Phil

Re: Cupboard doors – renovation

Postby Andyp » 19 Feb 2017, 14:07

Well worth the effort Phil.
cheers

Andy

if images are not visible on my posts it is because Photobucket withdrew their free hosting service. I will reload images to the most recent threads in due course. Please drop me a PM if you would like to see anything before then
User avatar
Andyp
Old Oak
 
Posts: 4408
Joined: 22 Jul 2014, 07:05
Location: 14860 Normandy, France
Name: Andy

Re: Cupboard doors – renovation

Postby Phil » 19 Feb 2017, 14:46

Thanks Andy.

Busy with the last of the passage doors which are being painted, so have to make sure all the holes, dings and chips are all filled properly. Just using any colour filler, and then they get a sealer before the undercoat.
I stop at the undercoat, he must hang them, undercoat any marks and then paint the same colour as the walls.

I need to extract digit as I need them completed by Wednesday. Going for my other eye op on Thursday and certainly do not want to mess around with any dust for a while.
Support courage where there is fear, foster agreement where there is conflict and inspire hope where there is despair – Nelson Mandela
User avatar
Phil
Old Oak
 
Posts: 1392
Joined: 23 Jul 2014, 05:11
Location: Southern Africa 0054
Name: Phil

Re: Cupboard doors – renovation

Postby MattS » 20 Feb 2017, 15:07

Good work - I'm going to be going through similar except in my own house. The previous owners replaced the original 60's doors like those with horrid pine doors which are now bright orange. I managed to get 8 doors free from a development property, really nice high quality doors better than would have been in the house originally but they're all slightly off in size and need new hinges etc. so not an easy task.

Everyone thinks we're mad wanting to put 60s features back in :lol:
MattS
New Shoots
 
Posts: 109
Joined: 04 Jul 2016, 10:05
Name:

Re: Cupboard doors – renovation

Postby TrimTheKing » 20 Feb 2017, 16:39

MattS wrote:...Everyone thinks we're mad wanting to put 60s features back in :lol:


I have to say, while I think Phil's work on restoring these has been extremely well done, I think the finished product is (In my opinion of course) ugly as all sin! They are exactly the kind of thing I ripped out of our first house as my first job. :?

Would be a boring life if we all liked the same stuff though eh.

Cheers
Mark
TrimTheKing
Site Admin
 
Posts: 3366
Joined: 16 Jun 2014, 13:27
Location: Grappenhall, Cheshire
Name: Mark

Re: Cupboard doors – renovation

Postby Tusses » 20 Feb 2017, 16:55

TrimTheKing wrote:
MattS wrote:...Everyone thinks we're mad wanting to put 60s features back in :lol:


I have to say, while I think Phil's work on restoring these has been extremely well done, I think the finished product is (In my opinion of course) ugly as all sin! They are exactly the kind of thing I ripped out of our first house as my first job. :?

Would be a boring life if we all liked the same stuff though eh.

Cheers
Mark


lol .. as JaJaBinks would say .. How woooooood ! lol

I like it for what it is :-)
I even thought they might look nice as table tops
Tusses
Old Oak
 
Posts: 1283
Joined: 08 May 2016, 10:48
Location: in the middle of the middle
Name:

Re: Cupboard doors – renovation

Postby TrimTheKing » 20 Feb 2017, 16:58

I hope it's not taken as rude… There's plenty of things in this life that are regarded as classics and to my eye/taste, are horrible. It doesn't mean I think I'm right…

I just think most things 60's come from a time of extremely poor design taste and there's very little from around that time that I like from both an architecture and furniture perspective.

I don't have anything against anyone else liking them though… :oops: :obscene-drinkingcheers:

Cheers
Mark
TrimTheKing
Site Admin
 
Posts: 3366
Joined: 16 Jun 2014, 13:27
Location: Grappenhall, Cheshire
Name: Mark

Re: Cupboard doors – renovation

Postby Tusses » 20 Feb 2017, 17:27

it was said in jest .. ala the JAJA ref ! :-)

it is to a taste .. as is most things in life : :eusa-dance:
Tusses
Old Oak
 
Posts: 1283
Joined: 08 May 2016, 10:48
Location: in the middle of the middle
Name:

Re: Cupboard doors – renovation

Postby TrimTheKing » 20 Feb 2017, 17:58

Tusses wrote:it was said in jest .. ala the JAJA ref ! :-)

it is to a taste .. as is most things in life : :eusa-dance:


Yep appreciate yours was in next mate, just wanted to make sure Phil didn't take it any other way. ;)

Cheers
Mark
TrimTheKing
Site Admin
 
Posts: 3366
Joined: 16 Jun 2014, 13:27
Location: Grappenhall, Cheshire
Name: Mark

Re: Cupboard doors – renovation

Postby MattS » 20 Feb 2017, 20:43

TrimTheKing wrote:I hope it's not taken as rude… There's plenty of things in this life that are regarded as classics and to my eye/taste, are horrible. It doesn't mean I think I'm right…

I just think most things 60's come from a time of extremely poor design taste and there's very little from around that time that I like from both an architecture and furniture perspective.

I don't have anything against anyone else liking them though… :oops: :obscene-drinkingcheers:

Cheers
Mark


:lol: I have to say I like a lot of mid century design and architecture, including the 60s. There was an amazing house in the RIBA house of the year shortlist which was a refurb of a piece of good 60s architecture, I suspect you wouldn't like it, as you say we can't all like the same stuff! Horses for courses!

The other thing is I'm quite particular about authenticity and originality. Both my wife and I were children of the 80s and 90s. My wife's parents bought a run down 30s property and ripped out a lot of features to suit current fashion. Maybe 60s won't be desirable to the same level but if everyone them out then you loose a bit of history.

Anyway sorry for taking the thread of topic!
MattS
New Shoots
 
Posts: 109
Joined: 04 Jul 2016, 10:05
Name:

Re: Cupboard doors – renovation

Postby Phil » 23 Feb 2017, 09:34

TrimTheKing wrote:
Tusses wrote:it was said in jest .. ala the JAJA ref ! :-)

it is to a taste .. as is most things in life : :eusa-dance:


Yep appreciate yours was in next mate, just wanted to make sure Phil didn't take it any other way. ;)

Cheers
Mark


Mark, no problem I will sit in the corner and sulk. :( for maybe 2 seconds :lol:

I will say one thing for those doors, they will last another 40 years compared to the PB-Melamine C R A P we have in our new house with funny hinges that need adjusting.
Support courage where there is fear, foster agreement where there is conflict and inspire hope where there is despair – Nelson Mandela
User avatar
Phil
Old Oak
 
Posts: 1392
Joined: 23 Jul 2014, 05:11
Location: Southern Africa 0054
Name: Phil

Re: Cupboard doors – renovation

Postby Phil » 23 Feb 2017, 09:38

MattS wrote:
Anyway sorry for taking the thread of topic!


You are not really off topic, all relates back to the doors.

Of which the last passage one has had no work on it this week.
Due to writing reports and having the electrician here sorting out their mess before the inspector will issue a new COC. (another topic later)
Support courage where there is fear, foster agreement where there is conflict and inspire hope where there is despair – Nelson Mandela
User avatar
Phil
Old Oak
 
Posts: 1392
Joined: 23 Jul 2014, 05:11
Location: Southern Africa 0054
Name: Phil

Re: Cupboard doors – renovation

Postby Phil » 05 Mar 2017, 13:26

Some more boring work …………………….

The passage cupboard doors are being painted the same colour as the walls (passage is quite dark), therefore require a lot more attention to filling and sanding the dings and scratches.
I was more aggressive with the sanding starting at 100 grit and then moving up through the grits.
Once sanded and patched, a coat of sealer was applied and a fine sanding to denib brush and dust spots. On top of that was a coat of universal undercoat, lengthwise, with some tint bringing the colour a lot closer to the final coats.
Again a fine sanding and then another coat across the width with another sanding and also some scraping with the Stanley blade to get rid of any brush marks. Turn it over and repeat for the other side.


Image

Image


One large door and the two small ones completed. The second large door will be completed when I am allowed back into the garage. (the eye op was a lot bigger and more stressful than the last one)

Thank you for reading
Cheers
Phil
Support courage where there is fear, foster agreement where there is conflict and inspire hope where there is despair – Nelson Mandela
User avatar
Phil
Old Oak
 
Posts: 1392
Joined: 23 Jul 2014, 05:11
Location: Southern Africa 0054
Name: Phil

Re: Cupboard doors – renovation

Postby Phil » 11 Nov 2017, 10:45

Ok, I have not quite been sitting idle these last couple of weeks/months.
This is a long story, so get yourself comfortable.

First of all, apologies – no pics. Yes, you can stone me, whip me, tar & feather, keel-haul, lock me in the stocks or whatever. :oops:
My little Samsung takes pics which can only be sent by SMS. It does not have a USB port!

I have been working at son & dil’s house.
Sanding down metal door frames, undercoating and then 2 top coats.

Paint used:-
Plascon Universal Undercoat with a bit of tint thrown in to get closer to the top coat colour. (Oil based)
Plascon Broken White topcoat enamel (oil based)
It is touch dry in about 4 hours and can get second coat in just under 24 hours.

There are 12 of them plus the built in cupboard frames in the passage & bed2.

In the in-between times I stripped and sanded and painted the passage cupboard doors. They got 3 top coats, using a small roller, before I was satisfied. They had to be loaded at home and offloaded from the bakkie on my own without being knocked or damaged. Then also hung working on my own. The big doors are bulky and heavy.

I am actually embarrassed when I look back and see how long these took!

My excuse – banned from workshop for 5 months while the left eye healed and had to avoid dust.

I also painted this half, bedroom side, of the passage walls. 3 Coats.

Also in the in-between times I sanded, repaired, sprayed and hung 4 room doors, as well as the 6 cupboard doors from bed 2.
These doors were all sprayed with a clear matt PU.
The 4 room doors also had new locks and handles fitted. A bit of rasping to fit the new lock. Nice easy-peasy job. (rasp – hand tool!)

The first lot of cupboard doors that I did a couple of months ago, I used the compressor to spray on the PU. Nice kit but a ballache with the hoses and cleaning. (the compressor is kept at their house)


I have for some time wanted something smaller for spraying that I could use at home. Surfed around for HVLP and then visited all the tool suppliers.
The selection here is quite pathetic and ended up buying this one.

https://www.bosch-do-it.com/ae/en/diy/t ... 199927.jsp


Nice, compact, easy to use and clean.
The coat being applied is ‘thicker’ than with the compressor. I found 3 coats fine compared to 6 with the compressor.
Process:- first coat + 800 grit rub, second coat + 800 grit rub, final coat + 1000 grit rub and a once over with a soft cloth.
I did all the spraying outside in the sun so drying time was very quick.


The hinges had been sanded and painted, while I was sanding the door, and fitted at home before being transported back to their house.
Final adjustments were done with the door hanging. Surprising how well the very thin, <1mm cardboard from biscuit boxes work as spacers between the door and hinge.
What is extremely important to do, is mark which hinge is top or bottom.

My really biggest problem was handling the doors on my own being bulky and heavy.
From workshop onto bakkie and off again onto spray supports not too bad.
However carrying the finished door into the house requires navigating 2 steps, the patio, through the front door, into the passage, around a corner, down the passage and then into the room for hanging.

My greatest nightmare was maybe tripping and falling with the door. See dining room door!

THE Dining room door!
This had been butchered into place about 40 years ago. The door had to be forced close catching on the frame and striker plate.
Before I took the door off, major exercise getting those pins out, I marked with masking tape the areas that needed to be trimmed on the edges.
There was lots of repair work as the veneer panels had come loose on the edges from the force-closing of the door.

Door went back for spraying, all fine so far. Carried door in to hang, all fine so far.
On the hinge edge in the middle of the door I needed to take off about 1.5mm over about 300mm.
Not a problem, door off, out to garage to sand off the section using the belt sander. (nice piece of equipment) Then apply some stain and spray the edge.

All going well according to plan.
Pick the door up and head for the house.

Wham! O BIG SH1T! I tripped on the bottom stair, the door went flat down on the tiles, hinges at the bottom. And 90kg deadweight on top. :oops:
The clumsy, stupid, half-wit, a-hole, incompetent, useless, fifth rate idiot lifted himself up and checked for damage. No blood, so nothing serious.

Lifted the door up and a quick visual check saw no major damage to the face of the door.
Hung the door. Beautiful fit, open and close like a dream. Lock and handles fitted looks smart.

Pack up and push off home.

It should be noted that no bad language was used except ‘o sh1t’ as dil is in the hosue.

Back the next day to do some more painting. Checked this SOB door. The veneer panels had come loose in a few places. My decision – just leave it and deal with it next year when some of the other room doors are repaired.

Somewhere in-between all this I helped son strip out ceilings and cornices in the second half of the passage and install new ceiling boards (Gypsum boards) The new cornices are poly-styrene which he did on his own.
The walls are washed down with sugar soap (son), holes plugged with polyfilla (me), old sliding door rails removed (me) all ready for the painting contractor.

The painting contractor, (that’s me) starts very early, 06:45
There was one door ready for spraying, so I did that first, about 2.5hours work.
Then the painting started.

The walls are a rough plaster finish, which means no quick roll-over with the roller. Small sections are done forcing the roller over the plaster to ensure all the little valleys are covered.
Packed up at 15:00 absolutely knackered. No beer at home to ease the pain.
The second and third coats went a lot quicker and easier.

Just for information and to bear in mind I had a deadline – B-day 3rd November.

What was left on my project list to do before 3 November:-
Back door (metal frame already done)
Front door (wooden frame still to be done)

Both doors are stable doors in need of replacement, but that is unbudgeted cash flow, and can be replaced in a couple of years. Decision made to refurbish them.

Back door first, then the kitchen area is complete.
It is solid wood, probably Meranti. Easier to handle each half although very heavy.

I had taken my trestles to their house and set up a work station in the garage using one of the old doors for a top.

Bottom half – sanding, scraping with Stanley blade, plugging holes, more sanding, and more sanding.
The previous owners must have had some large dogs years ago as the outside showed lots of gouge marks from their claws.
I decided to not sand out the marks but rather clean them up and smooth them out a bit.

Then the top half, similar process.
The lock/handle was one of these round things where you push and turn the little thing on the inside to lock the door. The hole into the door side is then very small with all the mechanism being in the handle.
Definitely to be replaced by a barrel type lock and new handles.

I took the new lock and marked out with masking tape where it fitted and where new holes had to be drilled for the key and handle.
Nice and easy drawing on the masking tape.


This part of the story now becomes extremely embarrassing and I apologise profusely to a number of our esteem members. :oops: :oops: :oops:

I had to resort to using some hand chisels and some woody-hammer thing to make the hole for the new lock. :oops:
These were all still wrapped up in bubble wrap from when we moved in May 2015.

Fortunately ‘someone’ :D had sharpened the chisels years ago and they sliced through the wood like butter.
Another easy-peasy job, looks good, works good. Very chuffed with myself. :D

The inside of the doors I sprayed with the PU used on the other doors. The outside requires some UV resistant PU applied by brush.
Tried a new UV PU product. Bad mistake, will get to that later.

I applied the first coat with the doors hanging, lot easier as the PU takes 24 hours to cure.
Went back the next day. The first coat was still tacky. Very disappointed.
So I took a rag with turps and rubbed the doors down, still some tackyness. A rag with thinners removed some more of the crap.
This was Wednesday 1st November, dil in hospital, baby arriving 3 days early!!! (the best laid plans of mice and men …)

The back door will now have to wait a few weeks, as well as the front door.
I packed up all my tools and painting equipment and vacated the site. (This was all just dumped in our garage and I still need to clean the sanders and pack everything away.)
All my painting drop sheets are still at their house and need to be washed before they can be packed away.

Can’t subject new grandson to all the dust I create and the smell of the paint and PU.

The new UV PU. It looks like it might work ok on a raw wood sanded surface, but certainly not on what I was dealing with.
The spray on PU on the inside of the doors, no issues at all.
I have some Wooddoc in the garage for outside use and might just try it on a small area first.

Just in case someone is wondering what the old fart does in his spare time, well he is reviewing a set of annual financial statements and the details that make up the statements.


Cheers
Phil
Support courage where there is fear, foster agreement where there is conflict and inspire hope where there is despair – Nelson Mandela
User avatar
Phil
Old Oak
 
Posts: 1392
Joined: 23 Jul 2014, 05:11
Location: Southern Africa 0054
Name: Phil

Re: Cupboard doors – renovation

Postby Malc2098 » 11 Nov 2017, 11:31

Blimey, Phil. I'll have to go and have a lie down after reading that!

Me and Mission Control have six children between us. I'd be a shadow of my former self if I gave to all of them what you give to yours!!! :lol:
Malcolm
User avatar
Malc2098
Old Oak
 
Posts: 1639
Joined: 03 Jul 2016, 11:10
Location: Tiverton
Name: Malcolm


Return to General Woodworking

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest