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Japanese hand saws

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Re: Japanese hand saws

Postby Alder » 06 Feb 2019, 23:18

Thank you for the replies.
Andyp: My sawing with Western saws is pretty good. As only an occasional woodworker it took some practice.
Malc2098. I have tried sawing as you suggest holding the handle towards the end with a degree of success.
I am busy at he moment but will continue to practice and might even venture to make a dovetail joint using the Japanese saw to do the sawing.
i will report back sometime and might even start a sub thread on what to make with my off cuts! (tongue firmly in Cheek)
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Re: Japanese hand saws

Postby Woodbloke » 06 Feb 2019, 23:48

MY63 wrote:I find the Japanese saws easier on my hands than European saws
My budget is £100 my first thought was to buy one handmade Ryoba saw and maybe a replacement blade for my current saw.
The handmade saws are described as "intollerant of abuse" the next option is to buy a set of four for £100 with replacable blades.

Thoughts and advice appreciated


I've been using the Gyokucho saws from WH for some years now and I find them superb. Previously I'd used a couple of offerings from Ax which weren't even close; they cut quite well but I found that teeth snapped off far too easily...and I was being careful!

A couple of days ago, I rang up Matt at WH and discussed the merits or otherwise of the hand made Japanese saws that he's offering on the website. The standard replaceable blade saws are excellent but are the base line or starting point for these tools; he mentioned that a hand made saw is a quantum leap up, but they won't suffer fools and are 'intolerant of abuse'.
After the natter with Matt, I decided to gird loins and take a punt so a couple of days later....

IMG_2542.jpg
(172.35 KiB)


....these beauties were delivered, one of which is the Gyokucho TS130, the uber-sexy :D dovetail saw with a blade that's only 0.15mm thick :o
I haven't yet had a chance to use them, but the two larger saws weren't supplied with blade guards, so I need to get hold of some slide binders from WHS. Initial thought's are that the teeth on the hand made rip are much finer than the saw it replaced but if peeps are interested I'll post a review later on - Rob
I no longer work for Axminster Tools & Machinery.
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Re: Japanese hand saws

Postby Woodbloke » 07 Feb 2019, 00:01

Malc2098 wrote:The best advice I was given was that the saw, your wrist, your elbow and your shoulder all had to be in line while you are sawing, slicing etc.

For the Japanese saw, I have always found that holding the handle towards the end, rather than in the middle or close to the blade, and at the same time use a very shallow angle downwards or upwards depending on which edge you are cutting, the one close to you or the one away from you, seems to work for me. I also found that making a straight cut across the work doesn't work for me, but starting with an edge does.


This was taken a few years ago and shows Nagatsu-san at 'The Japanese Tool Group Society' (now disbanded) near Salisbury using one of his ryoba's to rip a bit of timber.

DSC_0032.jpg
(304.37 KiB)


He wasn't a saw maker, but a professional tuner; this particular saw has gullets between groups of teeth to help clear sawdust. Superb to use :geek: and note the angle of attack and where he holds it - Rob
I no longer work for Axminster Tools & Machinery.
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