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Sharpening a gouge

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Sharpening a gouge

Postby Mike G » 18 Oct 2020, 08:17

Is there any alternative for doing the inside face of a gouge other than a bit of sandpaper wrapped around a dowel?
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Re: Sharpening a gouge

Postby droogs » 18 Oct 2020, 08:44

slip stones is what I use mainly but I also have a couple of diamond thingys that lidl sell every now and then for any coarser work the fix things

sort of like this
[img]
https://www.millyskitchenstore.co.uk/ei ... _hires.jpg[/img]
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Re: Sharpening a gouge

Postby Raymedullary » 18 Oct 2020, 09:01

Sandpaper? that won't do much, however I do know that you mean emery. Yes a slipstone is what you need.
They are available in different profiles and grades to suit.
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Re: Sharpening a gouge

Postby Mike G » 18 Oct 2020, 09:39

Thanks guys. I'll have to get a fine one, as mine is only any use for doing the sickle.
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Re: Sharpening a gouge

Postby Woodbloke » 18 Oct 2020, 10:13

Mike G wrote:Is there any alternative for doing the inside face of a gouge other than a bit of sandpaper wrapped around a dowel?

The ideal thing are the small leather wheels on a Tormek, but they're a bit spendy. A much more economical way to hone/polish the inside of a gouge is thus:

Procure a long bolt (say 8mm dia), a couple of wide 'penny washers' and a nut.

Secondly, find an oddment of mdf to fit the gouge and make it into a 'wheel' shape (a lathe is useful here :eusa-whistle: ) say around 50mm dia; not critical.

Drill an 8mm hole in the centre, mount the blank onto the nut/bolt mandrel and insert into the pillar drill.

Use a file (or similar) to shape the profile of mdf semicircular whilst it's spinning in the pillar drill.

Dress the edge of the mdf with suitable honing grit ('T' Cut, Solvol, green Chromium Dioxide paste etc etc)

Polish the inside of the gouge to a mirror finish.

These instructions aren't for you though Mike, but for your 'friend' :lol: - Rob
I no longer work for Axminster Tools & Machinery.
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Re: Sharpening a gouge

Postby Andyp » 18 Oct 2020, 11:34

keep at it Rob, we will squeeze him out of the closet eventually. :)
cheers

Andy

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Re: Sharpening a gouge

Postby MY63 » 18 Oct 2020, 12:35

Hi Mike How about a strop made around a dowel ?
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Re: Sharpening a gouge

Postby Mike G » 18 Oct 2020, 13:25

I can do wheels really nicely already, using my pillar drill. I hadn't thought to have spinning bits of shaped MDF impregnated with honing compound. That's certainly a good idea. Two or three wheels of differing profiles should cover the range. I'm actually investing in gouges at the moment as I have quite a bit of carving coming up. I might start a thread when I get a minute showing the various design choices. Carving really is a more interesting looking "slope" than turning.
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Re: Sharpening a gouge

Postby Woodbloke » 18 Oct 2020, 14:13

Mike G wrote:I can do wheels really nicely already, using my pillar drill. I hadn't thought to have spinning bits of shaped MDF impregnated with honing compound. That's certainly a good idea. Two or three wheels of differing profiles should cover the range. I'm actually investing in gouges at the moment as I have quite a bit of carving coming up. I might start a thread when I get a minute showing the various design choices. Carving really is a more interesting looking "slope" than turning.

Rather than a pillar drill Mike, if you can mount the mdf mandrels in a old mains drill and use it horizontally from the reverse side, it makes it a smidge easier.

For my up and coming linenfold project, a good mate of mine (Andy Pickard) recommended Pfeil gouges from CHT

Andyp wrote:keep at it Rob, we will squeeze him out of the closet eventually. :)


Could be a bit like wading through treacle though Andy :lol: - Rob
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Re: Sharpening a gouge

Postby PAC1 » 26 Nov 2020, 21:45

For large gouges you can get a cone shaped stone (Icebear). For smaller gouges there are the diamond hones recommended above or a multitude of slip stones. In particular the Pfiel slip stones. Another useful approach is a flexicut profiled hone and honing compound (I do not like their tools but the profiled hone is very useful)
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Re: Sharpening a gouge

Postby PAC1 » 26 Nov 2020, 21:53

Woodbloke. Pfiel gouges are the best. The steel is very good. Sometimes the bevel angle from the factory is wrong and you find yourself bouncing off the back of the bevel before the cut engages but they are easy fixed. Choose carefully there are hundreds to go at and it is too easy to get a box full and end up only using two or three.
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Re: Sharpening a gouge

Postby Pete Maddex » 02 Dec 2020, 22:58

I use one of the cheap sanding drum sets for re-establishing the bevel then waterstone slip stones a 1000 and a 4000, then strop with autosol on a dowel.

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