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Pan lid handle

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Pan lid handle

Postby Weekend_Woodworker » 11 Feb 2024, 16:39

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We have had a set of these pans for a few years, the handles on the pan lids have been getting gradually wobblier until today when one came off. The appear to be held through the glass lid via an aluminum rivet which has corroded away in the dishwasher. (It did say it was dishwasher safe).

So the question is how would you repair them? I am looking for something that is functional, hygienic, doesn’t look too heath robinson and is not too difficult to fit.

Suggestions most welcome!


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Re: Pan lid handle

Postby Woodbloke » 11 Feb 2024, 17:22

Assuming the pan is stainless steel, I'd think about stainless bolts and a couple of polished, domed headed ss nuts with perhaps some softish washers; dunno whether or not that's feasible - Rob
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Re: Pan lid handle

Postby AJB Temple » 11 Feb 2024, 18:03

Yes - as above. SS bolts. Loctite that will withstand engine oils and temps should survive dishwasher. Stops nuts coming loose with hot / cold cycling.
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Re: Pan lid handle

Postby Weekend_Woodworker » 11 Feb 2024, 19:18

Thanks Adrian and Rob. I had forgotten about domed head nuts. I have some locktite I’ll have to see if it is the right stuff.


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Re: Pan lid handle

Postby Lurker » 11 Feb 2024, 23:07

Have a look at Chicago screws.
Not sure if they go as big as you need though.
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Re: Pan lid handle

Postby Cabinetman » 11 Feb 2024, 23:49

I think Chicago bolts will be available in the right sizes, but would some sort of rubber (obviously not) washer be needed to prevent the glass breaking?
I think they must have broken a few lids just getting the force on those ally rivets right consistently.
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Re: Pan lid handle

Postby Weekend_Woodworker » 11 Feb 2024, 23:58

Thank your for the further ideas. I had just ordered some stainless bolts and domed nuts from eBay. But now you have told me about Chicago bolts they do look like they mights be neater! I mights try some of those as well. Either way a whole lot cheaper than buying a new set of pans when everything else is perfectly serviceable.
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Re: Pan lid handle

Postby Sheffield Tony » 12 Feb 2024, 00:06

It looks from the picture that there are (silicone rubber ?) bushes in the holes through the glass.

Agree with the safer route of stainless bolt and domed nut though.

I imagine dishwasher tablets have an alkali in them to saponify grease. And dissolve aluminium ...
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Re: Pan lid handle

Postby Weekend_Woodworker » 12 Feb 2024, 08:19

Yes sorry should have mentioned that they do have a clear rubber grommet for each hole through the glass lid. Now saponify is a new word on me, I am afraid I had to look it up, but I have learned something new!


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Re: Pan lid handle

Postby Pete Maddex » 12 Feb 2024, 09:46

Cup or button head SS bolt with a nylock nut on the inside.

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Re: Pan lid handle

Postby Eric the Viking » 12 Feb 2024, 10:43

Wot Pete said (as always!), but I'd use dome-headed Allen machine screws, with the Nyloc nut on the outside (you can get them in stainless steel, and they look very neat).

I have had very good service from Westfield Fasteners - they carry a good range in stainless and will even let you order singles if you really want to.

Tip: you will almost inevitably have to get a longer machine screw and cut it down to an appropriate length. In which case run an ordinary nut down to the head of the bolt before cutting it, either with a junior hacksaw or (better) a Dremel cut-off disc. You can then run the nut back off the screw, and it will re-form the thread at the saw cut (finish with a fine file at around 45deg to the bolt). Regarding length, if there's a clean start to the cut screw's end, it only needs to be roughly level with the top of the Nyloc nut - any extra thread does nothing. But don't cut it so short that it doesn't come all the way through the nylon part - that's essential.

E.

PS: if you think the dome head isn't sufficiently wide, Westfield also do stainless washers in various types, and you will find one that's the right diameter to replace the wide heads on the original rivets.
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Re: Pan lid handle

Postby 9fingers » 12 Feb 2024, 10:53

Id be tempted to add a fibre washer somewhere in the mix just to give a smigin of give to avoid cracking the glass. Readily available on evilbay

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Re: Pan lid handle

Postby SamQ aka Ah! Q! » 12 Feb 2024, 11:53

A second vote for Westfield. At the heritage railway I volunteer in, we have used them extensively. Great service, FAST dispatch and 'odd' threads - BSW, BSF sometimes, Metric, no problem. So far, the ex-engineers I work with have been impressed by the quality: no Chinesium or 'Monkey metal'. The stainless stuff in particular is of high quality control.

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Re: Pan lid handle

Postby Sheffield Tony » 12 Feb 2024, 12:05

Eric the Viking wrote:Wot Pete said (as always!), but I'd use dome-headed Allen machine screws, with the Nyloc nut on the outside (you can get them in stainless steel, and they look very neat).


Not Allen or other socket cap screw; they are not favoured in the food industry as they provide a collecting point that can't be cleaned out easily. Hex or straight slotted head is best.
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Re: Pan lid handle

Postby Lons » 12 Feb 2024, 13:42

I used plastic bolts and nut's on one of my daughter's pans years ago and still going strong as far as I know, she'd have moaned at me otherwise, but then she doesn't put the pans in the dishwasher. ;)

I already had them and think they might have been white number plate fixings. It did concern me at the time that they might soften with heat though.
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Re: Pan lid handle

Postby Weekend_Woodworker » 14 Feb 2024, 14:51

Well the nuts and bolts arrived today and after shortening the bolts very slightly they seem to do the job. Time will tell if they work loose but at least they are easy enough to tighten.Image
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