It is currently 28 Feb 2017, 06:50

Mike's Workshop Build (Extension)

Roll up, roll up. Here you will find everything from new workshop designs, through builds to completed workshop tours. All magnificently overseen by our own Mike G and his tremendously thorough 'Shed' design and generous advice.

Re: Mike's Workshop Build (Bench, woodrack & tour)

Postby Rod » 11 May 2015, 09:29

We like photos

Rod
User avatar
Rod
Old Oak
 
Posts: 2334
Joined: 21 Jul 2014, 21:34
Location: Winchester, Hampshire
Name:

Re: Mike's Workshop Build (Bench, woodrack & tour)

Postby Commander » 12 May 2015, 17:17

Ok so as requested, here are some photos:

This is what most of our tiles look like, there are some other designs available, and then there are the thatch roofs as well as roofs from corrugated iron etc etc, But a large proportion of houses use clay tiles, they are fairly big and pretty heavy (as you can see from the bricks in the background). They have holes for nailing to the brandering, but that is usually only used in windy areas, and then also only on the to 2 or 3 rows as the weight is normally enough to stop the roof from blowing away.
Image
Image

Here are some photos to show the general look and angle.
Image
Image

Here is the flashing under the tiles but above the brandering. (some of the photos are a bit unclear, but I wasn't about to start lifting tiles in my Sunday best! :lol:
Image
Image

Here is a photo showing the flashing where the tiles meet a wall, it has a different profile to the flashing used for the valleys.
Image

At the ends of the roof we use fascia boards (they use to be made from asbestos but I'm pretty sure these days they are made from cement) You can also use tiles made specifically for this purpose.
Image
Image

At the ridge of the roof a curved tile is used and is cemented on. In some problem areas we use a special fabric roll that is painted on with a brush and the appropriate watertight goo to stop leaks.
Image
Image
Image

Here you can see the ends of the roof trusses, as well as a section of brandering, as you can see they are pretty beefy to handle the weight.
Image

Under the tiles there is normally a plastic sheet to stop water in the event of very heavy rains and or driving winds, although I don't think this is actually a standard (the flats built by big developers seem to largely skimp on this detail without too much issues). I hope this was somewhat clear, if there are any questions I will try and answer as best I can!
Commander
Sapling
 
Posts: 441
Joined: 29 Apr 2015, 15:11
Location: Pretoria, RSA
Name: Erich

Re: Mike's Workshop Build (Bench, woodrack & tour)

Postby Mike G » 12 May 2015, 18:59

Those "under-tile" flashings are valleys. And that has to be the worst constructed valley I have ever seen on a modern western house!!! Don't your guys own angle grinders? :)

The principle difference between SA rooves and ours is the lack of "felt" (nowadays replaced by a waterproof and breathable membrane). This is a strong second line of defence against wind-blown water-penetration.

The rest is pretty orthodox, and quite comparable with modern estate-type houses in the UK, although we would never build with such shallow roof pitches, or with such widely-spaced rafters. Also, you never see water-proof jollop applied to the outside of a roof over here like in your 2nd and 3rd last photos.

Something that UK members might not know is that parts of South Africa (the "high veld"......Johannesburg and surrounds) have thunderstorms which are so severe that hail will write off any car that is left outside. Consider the type of roof you would have to construct to cope with that!

Anyway, nice to see the photos. Thanks for that, Erich.
User avatar
Mike G
Old Oak
 
Posts: 2508
Joined: 30 Jul 2014, 22:36
Location: Somewhat less of a hovel
Name:

Re: Mike's Workshop Build (Bench, woodrack & tour)

Postby Commander » 12 May 2015, 20:21

Mike G wrote:Those "under-tile" flashings are valleys. And that has to be the worst constructed valley I have ever seen on a modern western house!!! Don't your guys own angle grinders? :)

The principle difference between SA rooves and ours is the lack of "felt" (nowadays replaced by a waterproof and breathable membrane). This is a strong second line of defence against wind-blown water-penetration.

The rest is pretty orthodox, and quite comparable with modern estate-type houses in the UK, although we would never build with such shallow roof pitches, or with such widely-spaced rafters. Also, you never see water-proof jollop applied to the outside of a roof over here like in your 2nd and 3rd last photos.

Something that UK members might not know is that parts of South Africa (the "high veld"......Johannesburg and surrounds) have thunderstorms which are so severe that hail will write off any car that is left outside. Consider the type of roof you would have to construct to cope with that!

Anyway, nice to see the photos. Thanks for that, Erich.


Hahaha, yes the question however seems to be, do we use them? And it appears to be a resounding no! Probably a drawback of the much cheaper labour here in RSA, so often we see some poor quality of work...

My dad and I have spent a large amount of time on that roof trying to fix some of the issues that was created by the poor craftsmanship with which some parts were built.

With regards to the thunder storms, we had one in November 2 years back that in places punched holes straight through tile roofs, so it can get very bad, luckily hail stones that big are a bit of an exception, rather than a rule.
Commander
Sapling
 
Posts: 441
Joined: 29 Apr 2015, 15:11
Location: Pretoria, RSA
Name: Erich

Re: Mike's Workshop Build (Bench, woodrack & tour)

Postby 9fingers » 12 May 2015, 21:09

Thanks for the photos.
Your photo of the steel flashing is where we would use lead and dress it down to the profile of the tiles.

With your low angle tiles and the flashing that looks to be little more than a deflector for falling rain, it only takes a bit of wind to blow the water up & under the flashing.

Just the way different folks do different things eh?

Bob
Image
Information on induction motors here
https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B_GZrX ... sp=sharing
Email:motors@minchin.org.uk
User avatar
9fingers
Old Oak
 
Posts: 3121
Joined: 21 Jul 2014, 20:22
Location: Romsey Hampshire between Southampton and the New Forest
Name: Bob

Re: Mike's Workshop Build (Bench, woodrack & tour)

Postby kirkpoore1 » 14 May 2015, 00:32

Interesting tile roof. I note that your tiles aren't staggered, so that the seams are in line. I would think this might pose yet another potential leak issue. (But my experience with tile roofs is limited to helping carry tiles onto the roof of a house my dad built back in the early 70's. My sisters and I had to carry a quota up every day, three tiles per trip (7 lbs apiece) up a 2x12 to the nearest corner of the roof, and then over to wherever my dad was working.:) )

As for the flashing, I've never seen or heard of anything other than aluminum or galvanized steel here in the US, except on historical buildings where copper (or, I suppose, lead) might be used.

Kirk
User avatar
kirkpoore1
Nordic Pine
 
Posts: 589
Joined: 21 Jul 2014, 22:12
Location: O'Fallon, Illinois
Name: Kirk

Re: Mike's Workshop Build (Bench, woodrack & tour)

Postby Commander » 14 May 2015, 06:04

kirkpoore1 wrote:Interesting tile roof. I note that your tiles aren't staggered, so that the seams are in line. I would think this might pose yet another potential leak issue. (But my experience with tile roofs is limited to helping carry tiles onto the roof of a house my dad built back in the early 70's. My sisters and I had to carry a quota up every day, three tiles per trip (7 lbs apiece) up a 2x12 to the nearest corner of the roof, and then over to wherever my dad was working.:) )

As for the flashing, I've never seen or heard of anything other than aluminum or galvanized steel here in the US, except on historical buildings where copper (or, I suppose, lead) might be used.

Kirk


I would say under normal circumstances the roof doesn't actually leak (except for the areas where the original job was botched), however under different weather conditions it may be another story.

Here are a couple of links to the 4x4 community forum with some hail we got at the end of 2013, sorry for all the Afrikaans, the photos are at least self explanatory! :D

http://www.4x4community.co.za/forum/sho ... light=hail

http://www.4x4community.co.za/forum/sho ... light=hail

http://www.4x4community.co.za/forum/sho ... light=hail
Commander
Sapling
 
Posts: 441
Joined: 29 Apr 2015, 15:11
Location: Pretoria, RSA
Name: Erich

Re: Mike's Workshop Build (Bench, woodrack & tour)

Postby Mike G » 14 May 2015, 11:20

kirkpoore1 wrote:Interesting tile roof. I note that your tiles aren't staggered, so that the seams are in line. I would think this might pose yet another potential leak issue.......Kirk


Kirk, that is the fundamental difference between traditional plain tiles, pantiles and slates on one hand (shingles/ shakes, too), and interlocking tiles on the other. The modern interlocking ones have a much more complicated profile designed to allow them to overlap less than the older ones I mention (which are always 2 tiles deep anywhere on the roof), and as a by-product, they line up "vertically" down the roof.

Mike
User avatar
Mike G
Old Oak
 
Posts: 2508
Joined: 30 Jul 2014, 22:36
Location: Somewhat less of a hovel
Name:

Re: Mike's Workshop Build (Bench, woodrack & tour)

Postby PeterBassett » 14 May 2015, 15:09

Could I pose another electrics question?

Would this
http://www.screwfix.com/p/ip65-isolator ... -25a/15054
be what I need (or even suitable for, ats)
making a 16 amp feed for a tablesaw safe when plugged into one of these
http://www.screwfix.com/p/abb-surface-s ... ip44/1858f

Thanks again.

Pete
PeterBassett
Seedling
 
Posts: 19
Joined: 21 Jan 2015, 17:44
Name:

Re: Mike's Workshop Build (Bench, woodrack & tour)

Postby 9fingers » 14 May 2015, 15:17

You only need to pull the plug to isolate the tablesaw safely but if you want to prevent someone else using it for example you can use the isolator you linked to and fit a padlock to lock it in the off position.

Quite likely that both items will be cheaper from toolstation and they offer free post on over £10.

I find Screwfix are getting greedy these days and only use them if I have no choice. Stock levels can be poor in the shops too.

Bob
Image
Information on induction motors here
https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B_GZrX ... sp=sharing
Email:motors@minchin.org.uk
User avatar
9fingers
Old Oak
 
Posts: 3121
Joined: 21 Jul 2014, 20:22
Location: Romsey Hampshire between Southampton and the New Forest
Name: Bob

Re: Mike's Workshop Build (Bench, woodrack & tour)

Postby PeterBassett » 14 May 2015, 15:31

Thanks bob. Yes the idea is to stop the kids via a padlock. I'll have a look at toolstation.

Thanks again

Pete
PeterBassett
Seedling
 
Posts: 19
Joined: 21 Jan 2015, 17:44
Name:

Re: Mike's Workshop Build (Bench, woodrack & tour)

Postby Wizard9999 » 14 May 2015, 23:53

Bob's right. If I recall my recent purchase correctly the ToolStation 16A socket's about half that price.

Terry.
Wizard9999
Old Oak
 
Posts: 1407
Joined: 08 Aug 2014, 11:51
Location: Eversley, Hampshire
Name: Lord Radford

Re: Mike's Workshop Build (Bench, woodrack & tour)

Postby Mike G » 25 Jul 2015, 20:54

No photos, but I took a day out from my house build today to re-felt the workshop. It has stood too long with the old membrane exposed, and it leaked like a sieve during that storm last night. There was an inch of water on the floor this morning..........so everything out to dry, and then I popped the scaffold up, pulled the battens off, and put a new membrane on. I'll get the slates on in the next few weeks.
User avatar
Mike G
Old Oak
 
Posts: 2508
Joined: 30 Jul 2014, 22:36
Location: Somewhat less of a hovel
Name:

Re: Mike's Workshop Build (Bench, woodrack & tour)

Postby 9fingers » 25 Jul 2015, 21:02

Mike G wrote:No photos, but I took a day out from my house build today to re-felt the workshop. It has stood too long with the old membrane exposed, and it leaked like a sieve during that storm last night. There was an inch of water on the floor this morning..........so everything out to dry, and then I popped the scaffold up, pulled the battens off, and put a new membrane on. I'll get the slates on in the next few weeks.



Mike, Any Idea why the membrane has failed so quickly? Has it been attacked by the ultra violent light? I'm estimating that it can't have been on more than 9 months?

Bob
Image
Information on induction motors here
https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B_GZrX ... sp=sharing
Email:motors@minchin.org.uk
User avatar
9fingers
Old Oak
 
Posts: 3121
Joined: 21 Jul 2014, 20:22
Location: Romsey Hampshire between Southampton and the New Forest
Name: Bob

Re: Mike's Workshop Build (Bench, woodrack & tour)

Postby Mike G » 25 Jul 2015, 22:04

My initial thoughts, Bob, were along the lines of flapping in the wind had caused the nail-holes under the battens to open up a little. We also had a garden fire which emitted a few burning cinders with the smoke, so a couple of small pin-hole sized burns occurred. However, I had a really good go at it a week ago with silicon, repairing even the slightest damage, yet still it failed. So, I have got to assume that it has just been generally weakened by UV light. It certainly delaminated rather easily when I was handling it today.

The reason we use eaves carrier membranes is that breather roofing membranes are known to fail in UV light. Clearly, they fail in the manner of Formula 1 tyres....they're OK until they fall off a cliff, because only a month or so ago it was fine, with no sign of any leaks.

I left it up there, incidentally, just putting a layer over the top. This was more to do with the threatening nature of the weather today than any cunning scheme.
User avatar
Mike G
Old Oak
 
Posts: 2508
Joined: 30 Jul 2014, 22:36
Location: Somewhat less of a hovel
Name:

Re: Mike's Workshop Build (Bench, woodrack & tour)

Postby 9fingers » 25 Jul 2015, 22:27

I suppose there is no formal requirement to make it UV resistant as it would normally be tiled within a few days/weeks under virtually all applications so they just don't bother.

I used some left over DPM to cover my modest stock of scaffold boards and within a few years that was rendered useless by UV -again no need for resistance when used as intended.

Bob
Image
Information on induction motors here
https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B_GZrX ... sp=sharing
Email:motors@minchin.org.uk
User avatar
9fingers
Old Oak
 
Posts: 3121
Joined: 21 Jul 2014, 20:22
Location: Romsey Hampshire between Southampton and the New Forest
Name: Bob

Re: Mike's Workshop Build (Bench, woodrack & tour)

Postby Dan0741 » 10 Aug 2015, 20:43

Mike - Great work with the workshop, you have inspired me to get my hands dirty and have a go! Its truly incredible what one can learn from reading these posts, keep up the good work.

Kind regards,

Dan
...time is precious; waste it wisely...
Dan0741
Sapling
 
Posts: 330
Joined: 09 Aug 2015, 19:38
Location: nn6
Name: Dan

Re: Mike's Workshop Build (Bench, woodrack & tour)

Postby Mike G » 11 Aug 2015, 10:59

Thanks Dan. Don't forget your camera whilst you're getting your hands dirty! :)
User avatar
Mike G
Old Oak
 
Posts: 2508
Joined: 30 Jul 2014, 22:36
Location: Somewhat less of a hovel
Name:

Re: Mike's Workshop Build (Bench, woodrack & tour)

Postby Wizard9999 » 09 Nov 2015, 08:59

Mike

In addition to having read this thread like a good novel, I also use it as a reference and often pop back steal (sorry research) ideas. Just struck me that I still don't recall the roof slates having gone on. Have you had time to break off from the house and do the roof?

Sorry if. I missed it elsewhere.

Terry.
Wizard9999
Old Oak
 
Posts: 1407
Joined: 08 Aug 2014, 11:51
Location: Eversley, Hampshire
Name: Lord Radford

Re: Mike's Workshop Build (Bench, woodrack & tour)

Postby Mike G » 09 Nov 2015, 09:19

Not yet Terry. I'm hoping to do it in the next few weeks.
User avatar
Mike G
Old Oak
 
Posts: 2508
Joined: 30 Jul 2014, 22:36
Location: Somewhat less of a hovel
Name:

Re: Mike's Workshop Build (Bench, woodrack & tour)

Postby wallace » 07 Jan 2016, 13:24

Mike I just read the whole thread and really enjoyed it. I am planning a little extension and you have explained some things that were troubling my little brain
wallace
New Shoots
 
Posts: 215
Joined: 17 Aug 2014, 19:12
Name:

Re: Mike's Workshop Build (Bench, woodrack & tour)

Postby Wizard9999 » 08 Jan 2016, 07:56

wallace wrote:Mike I just read the whole thread and really enjoyed it. I am planning a little extension and you have explained some things that were troubling my little brain


Presumably for that new sander Wallace :lol: .

Terry.
Wizard9999
Old Oak
 
Posts: 1407
Joined: 08 Aug 2014, 11:51
Location: Eversley, Hampshire
Name: Lord Radford

Re: Mike's Workshop Build (Bench, woodrack & tour)

Postby DBT85 » 11 Jan 2016, 13:19

I've been having a good read through this and Wizard9999s threads for as much info as I can find to help me with my own workshop.

A great read! I shall have many questions no doubt!
User avatar
DBT85
Seedling
 
Posts: 6
Joined: 07 Jan 2016, 03:11
Location: London/Worcester
Name: Darren

Re: Mike's Workshop Build (Bench, woodrack & tour)

Postby Mike G » 11 Jan 2016, 13:52

Welcome Darren. Always happy to help with suggestions for a good workshop build.
User avatar
Mike G
Old Oak
 
Posts: 2508
Joined: 30 Jul 2014, 22:36
Location: Somewhat less of a hovel
Name:

Re: Mike's Workshop Build (Bench, woodrack & tour)

Postby Crispylettuce » 01 Feb 2016, 13:02

Awesome thread! I'm in the process of planning my own shed/workshop (unfortunately I don't have the space for an exclusive workshop!), and found this thread at a good time! Think I need to re-read it though!!

Sent from my MotoG3 using Tapatalk
Crispylettuce
New Shoots
 
Posts: 63
Joined: 17 Jan 2016, 09:41
Name:

PreviousNext

Return to Workshop Builds

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 0 guests