It is currently 16 Jan 2017, 13:54

The Linseed Paint Company

Help with choosing the right coloured milkpaint to slather all over your new project.

The Linseed Paint Company

Postby RogerS » 30 Aug 2016, 07:31

I recently came across this company and their website and thought they deserved a wider exposure.

NB They are not the company that used to be Holkham Paints.

http://www.linseedpaintcompany.co.uk

Some interesting stuff there. I've not used their stuff but will certainly think about it for the future.

A small extract ...

Acrylic cannot be reversed

This is a disaster for people with a passionate love of old properties. Acrylic paint and varnish cannot be removed with conventional paint stripper. Architectural salvage yards won't touch a door that has had an acrylic varnish applied directly to the timber. Ok, if you are painting your skirting boards you probably aren't worried about taking the paint off. But suppose you use an acrylic varnish on your beautifully stripped doors. And suppose you decide to use a coloured acrylic varnish because you want the yellow pine to be a deep mahogany color. Oops! That's when you discover that acrylic varnish sits on the wood surface and doesn't penetrate like oil or old polyurethene varnish. The colour sits on the surface and obscures the grain. Double oops! The acrylic varnish dries superfast and brushstrokes are clearly visible. Triple oops! Because it is so fast drying, overlapping brushstrokes double the amount of varnish on the timber and intensify the colour, leaving dark patches all over. Quadruple oops! Because it is water based, the water has been soaked up by the timber's fibres and they have become swollen. The whole surface is as rough as a badger's, well, rough bit. Now you have to sand the surface more than just lightly (denib is the trade jargon). Oops for the fifth time! (although by now it is swearing and blinding, not a genteel "oops") even a light sand takes plenty more off any high points (mouldings and corners for instance) and the colour of the varnish has gone, leaving light-coloured patches and lines all over the door as well as the dark patches where the brushstrokes overlapped. The job is done, it cannot be undone, and it looks like hell. Only thing to do now is paint it!
Fewer Smart things. More smart people.
User avatar
RogerS
Old Oak
 
Posts: 3306
Joined: 21 Jul 2014, 21:07
Location: Malvern
Name:

Re: The Linseed Paint Company

Postby Rod » 30 Aug 2016, 08:28

Jacob Butler has been pushing linseed paints for several years.

Rod
User avatar
Rod
Old Oak
 
Posts: 2291
Joined: 21 Jul 2014, 21:34
Location: Winchester, Hampshire
Name:

Re: The Linseed Paint Company

Postby Doug » 30 Aug 2016, 17:14

To be fair what I've seen of Jacobs paint work I've been quite impressed, it doesn't give the finish of traditional gloss paints but it certainly lasts & is easily revived by wiping over with linseed oil. That said when first applied it does take a while to go off, two days or longer dependant on the weather.
User avatar
Doug
Sapling
 
Posts: 372
Joined: 21 Jul 2014, 22:22
Location: Location Location
Name:


Return to Finishing

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest