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My new workshop

Roll up, roll up. Here you will find everything from new workshop designs, through builds to completed workshop tours. All magnificently overseen by our own Mike G and his tremendously thorough 'Shed' design and generous advice.

Re: My new workshop

Postby Blackswanwood » 11 Jan 2021, 23:30

That looks smart and plenty of natural light.
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Re: My new workshop

Postby Lurker » 12 Jan 2021, 12:48

Steve Maskery wrote:Excellent Jim. If it weren't for lockdown, I'd be very happy to give you a hand.


In the summer, you can come and paint it for me.
Thought cornflower with white door and window frames, somewhere I saw similar and thought that it was quite nice :) ;)
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Re: My new workshop

Postby Mike G » 12 Jan 2021, 13:10

Lurker wrote:That’s great then or is it?
The back wall is about 18” from my neighbours fence :eusa-whistle:
Thelma (the neighbough) is unlikely to care. The rear wall of the workshop is 2m and can just be seen from her side over the top of the fence. I want to put up the guttering by accessing from her garden and anticipate no problems.


That's obviously an issue, but it's only an issue if it comes to the attention of Building Control. Are you planning any alterations at your house? I find it more than a little frustrating that manufacturers/ installers don't flag up these issues. They know the rules, and it shouldn't be up to you, Jim, or any other layperson.

If you've got a 5 foot gap to the house, could you shove the shed bodily 550mm away from the fence, to leave a 1 metre gap?
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Re: My new workshop

Postby Steve Maskery » 12 Jan 2021, 14:28

Lurker wrote:
In the summer, you can come and paint it for me.


You're on.
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Re: My new workshop

Postby Lurker » 12 Jan 2021, 17:12

Mike G wrote:
Lurker wrote:That’s great then or is it?
The back wall is about 18” from my neighbours fence :eusa-whistle:
Thelma (the neighbough) is unlikely to care. The rear wall of the workshop is 2m and can just be seen from her side over the top of the fence. I want to put up the guttering by accessing from her garden and anticipate no problems.


That's obviously an issue, but it's only an issue if it comes to the attention of Building Control. Are you planning any alterations at your house? I find it more than a little frustrating that manufacturers/ installers don't flag up these issues. They know the rules, and it shouldn't be up to you, Jim, or any other layperson.

If you've got a 5 foot gap to the house, could you shove the shed bodily 550mm away from the fence, to leave a 1 metre gap?

.

Building regs work( Load bearing walls and sewer changes) was done and inspected in June
It's staying where is as the garden is not big enough to loose all that dead space.
Last place I had sheds where the shed wall was actually forming the boundary. :D

I knew all along I was technically wrong (mainly due to discussions here), so I have gone into it with my eyes open as it were.
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Re: My new workshop

Postby Lurker » 16 Jan 2021, 09:24

Question to the experts:

Tomorrow we start the roof, it's 19mm tongue and groove
Once on, it will be overlaid with felt.
Currently I have a big sheet of heavy duty plastic up there (just to keep the rest dry), it's the stuff that's used for dpc.
Are there pros and cons for sandwiching this between the wood and the felt?
Thought I might as well use it to add a bit of protection as otherwise is is going to get dumped.
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Re: My new workshop

Postby Cabinetman » 16 Jan 2021, 11:00

I’m presuming the roof is 19 mil OSB T and G.? If you were to put the DPC sheet on under the felt it would have to be stuck down presumably with something like bitumen or else the whole felt bit could slide about, Personally I would ask the experts. Ian
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Re: My new workshop

Postby Lurker » 16 Jan 2021, 11:43

The t & g is softwood, same stuff as in the floor boards that I laid yesterday.
Good point about the felt sliding about.
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Re: My new workshop

Postby Lurker » 17 Jan 2021, 17:49

The lads have put up the t&g roof, I'm lucky to have two excellent workers!
Weather proofed with the dpc until next weekend when the felt goes on.

The pallet was made of planed and edged timber of the same quality as the rest of the building, that I assume was rejected for some reason.

I plan to cut this to size, treat it and then use it to overlay the joists all round.
My assumption is this will be a five year plus sacrificial splash cover for the joists .
Two sides will also prevent vermin from getting underneath.
The joists are laid onto slabs which are slightly heigher that the surrounding ground and extend at least 6" beyond the joists .

Can anyone see problems with this ?
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Re: My new workshop

Postby Lurker » 18 Jan 2021, 15:51

Felt on the roof.
It’s just occurred to me that I don’t know what to do.

I have 5300 x 4500 of roof to felt.
I have 6 x 10 metre rolls of felt.

I know that you start at the eve and work up to the highest point (I have pent roof ) overlaying as you go.

1. What amount of overlap per run.
I will have 6 x 4m bits of waste, so I was going to put two of these under the first run ( the one nearest the eve) and the last run, on the assumption these ones are most likely to spring a leak one day.

Am uneasy about felt nails but adhesive will not work as the sheets are sanded (green grit).

Help!!
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Re: My new workshop

Postby 9fingers » 18 Jan 2021, 16:22

The mineral stuff is the top layer. Two layers of underfelt stcuck on with hot bitumen and same stuff for the top layer. Never done it myself but had it done by specialists a few times.

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Re: My new workshop

Postby Lurker » 18 Jan 2021, 17:37

9fingers wrote:The mineral stuff is the top layer. Two layers of underfelt stcuck on with hot bitumen and same stuff for the top layer. Never done it myself but had it done by specialists a few times.

Bob


I think you are right
Not what I wanted to hear though ;)

Been thinking about this today.
I might proceed with felt and clout nails etc and then in the summer get someone in to do as you suggest.

We haven't completed on the old house yet because I still need to transfer the workshop and the wood store (plus the lockdown issues). So money is getting a bit tight.

Further........ Am aware that log cabins have got a bad reputation in some places.
I would like to know about the specific issues so I can mitigate.
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Re: My new workshop

Postby Mike G » 18 Jan 2021, 17:41

Have you considered EPDM, Jim?
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Re: My new workshop

Postby Lurker » 18 Jan 2021, 17:49

Mike G wrote:Have you considered EPDM, Jim?



Yes, it might well be the option come July, although other than hearing about it here I haven't a clue as to what it is.
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Re: My new workshop

Postby 9fingers » 18 Jan 2021, 18:00

Mike G wrote:Have you considered EPDM, Jim?


Now that I have done.
Single sheet of EPDM 1-1.5mm thick. Water based latex adhesive for most of the area and spirit based contact adhesive for the edges, drip rails etc.

Youtube videos show you how. Basically layout EPDM over the roof with excess all round. Allow to relax. Fold back on itself exposing half of the deck. Apply adhesive with a roller to the deck and most of the rubber, not the edges. unfold to cover the roof. Fold back the other half, apply adhesive, unfold as before using a clean roller to smooth out. When that is all dry, think out how you are going to fold, mitre, tuck the edges and corners. Then work round the edges with the contact adhesive forming drip rails etc to line up with gutters etc.

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Re: My new workshop

Postby Lurker » 18 Jan 2021, 19:10

Thanks ^^^^^^^
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Re: My new workshop

Postby Mike G » 18 Jan 2021, 21:25

Lurker wrote:......... although other than hearing about it here I haven't a clue as to what it is.


It is indistinguishable from the rubber of a tyre inner tube. It's simple, bomb-proof, and if you don't buy all the plastic trim, cheap as chips. Fit and forget. Your grandkids will thank you.
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Re: My new workshop

Postby Lurker » 18 Jan 2021, 22:01

Sounds a plan then......... For the summer.
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Re: My new workshop

Postby AJB Temple » 18 Jan 2021, 22:24

If it were me I would take the felt back and do EPDM now. Just do the job once. It lasts forever pretty much! I also find it a lot easier to handle and lay than felt. Had to do my wife's potting shed last summer. I hate heights. Getting on a roof twice is enough to put me off!
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Re: My new workshop

Postby Lurker » 19 Jan 2021, 12:49

AJB Temple wrote:If it were me I would take the felt back and do EPDM now. Just do the job once. It lasts forever pretty much! I also find it a lot easier to handle and lay than felt. Had to do my wife's potting shed last summer. I hate heights. Getting on a roof twice is enough to put me off!


In normal circumstances I would do exactly that,but

I rely on my sons at the moment because I am restricted in what I can do following a bleed in the back of my eye ball last October.
Also as I said, I need to be careful with money until the house sale is complete.
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Re: My new workshop

Postby 9fingers » 19 Jan 2021, 12:56

Lurker wrote:
AJB Temple wrote:If it were me I would take the felt back and do EPDM now. Just do the job once. It lasts forever pretty much! I also find it a lot easier to handle and lay than felt. Had to do my wife's potting shed last summer. I hate heights. Getting on a roof twice is enough to put me off!


In normal circumstances I would do exactly that,but

I rely on my sons at the moment because I am restricted in what I can do following a bleed in the back of my eye ball last October.
Also as I said, I need to be careful with money until the house sale is complete.


I wonder if the approach could be to cover up with tarps for now whilst health and finance issues improve and then put EPDM later when the weather is far more suitable for such a job.

Bob
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Re: My new workshop

Postby Lurker » 19 Jan 2021, 13:29

9fingers wrote:
Lurker wrote:
AJB Temple wrote:If it were me I would take the felt back and do EPDM now. Just do the job once. It lasts forever pretty much! I also find it a lot easier to handle and lay than felt. Had to do my wife's potting shed last summer. I hate heights. Getting on a roof twice is enough to put me off!


In normal circumstances I would do exactly that,but

I rely on my sons at the moment because I am restricted in what I can do following a bleed in the back of my eye ball last October.
Also as I said, I need to be careful with money until the house sale is complete.


I wonder if the approach could be to cover up with tarps for now whilst health and finance issues improve and then put EPDM later when the weather is far more suitable for such a job.

Bob


Again a good idea, currently exactly that with a big black plastic sheet.

But I can’t return the felt as I have had it for 3 months and it’s been out in the weather also I am conscious of the roof being an eyesore for my neighbour.
And, a mate who put up EPDM on his roof can help me when we are not all infectious.
As a result of advice here I asked him yesterday afternoon what he used and he echoed what you have all said.
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Re: My new workshop

Postby Gary » 19 Jan 2021, 14:30

Check out William griffin on YouTube he has a number of videos about the roof.
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Re: My new workshop

Postby Lurker » 19 Jan 2021, 16:11

Thanks
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