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Grain filling

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Grain filling

Postby RogerS » 30 Dec 2016, 17:39

Came across these photos that were going to form part of a magazine article. They show some Bubinga (African Satinwood if you want to be posh) with unfilled grain.

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Here with some grain filler starting to be applied

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(would have helped if I'd taken photos of the same area of timber :( )

and in a contrasting colour

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If you look closely you can see that the grain filler has been dragged out in a few places. This next photo using a darker grain filler shows it better. Really got too enthusiastic with the wiping.

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Re: Grain filling

Postby 9fingers » 30 Dec 2016, 18:53

I've never tried grain filling Roger. What is the technique? Apply liberally allow to dry and sand the excess off?
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Re: Grain filling

Postby RogerS » 30 Dec 2016, 19:06

Apply with coarse cloth i.e. Curtaining or Hessian in a circular motion, finishing off across the grain. Leave until the ‘wet look’ has gone then wipe off across the grain with a clean coarse cloth to remove the excess. Leave to dry overnight and paper with 150-180 grit sandpaper.

The key is not to apply too much and also the timing before you wipe off to remove the excess.

Jecofil is my favourite brand and they are also very helpful.
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Re: Grain filling

Postby RogerS » 30 Dec 2016, 19:13

This is one of my earlier attempts.

Starting to apply it

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Wiping it in

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Wiping off the excess (too energetically/too late)

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The good thing is that you can sand back then re-apply.
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Re: Grain filling

Postby Pinch » 30 Dec 2016, 19:45

I've only grain filled once and that was back in 1994 - a walnut display cabinet.

I don't remember it being that difficult to do and I think I only made one application, although it was a messy job. The filler was applied into walnut and burr walnut with a shellac finish. If memory serves, the top consisted of 36 coats of button polish.

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Re: Grain filling

Postby Phil » 04 Jan 2017, 13:16

RogerS wrote: They show some Bubinga (African Satinwood if you want to be posh) with unfilled grain.



We know Bubinga as African Rosewood (one of the specie)

The bits that I have used in projects have been very close grain. Nice to work with but a bastward to plane as the grain just changes direction in the middle of the plank.
Tools (router bits and blades) must be super sharp.

Beautiful finish just with a couple of coats of oil. (I posted somewhere the coffee grinder boxes I made)

Some other info.

http://www.rarewoods.co.za/wood-browser/bubinga

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/African_rosewood

Ooops...you're right, Phil...my mistake. :oops: At least African Rosewood doesn't smell like Zebrano !
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Re: Grain filling

Postby Phil » 05 Jan 2017, 14:56

Phil wrote:
RogerS wrote: They show some Bubinga (African Satinwood if you want to be posh) with unfilled grain.



We know Bubinga as African Rosewood (one of the specie)

The bits that I have used in projects have been very close grain. Nice to work with but a bastward to plane as the grain just changes direction in the middle of the plank.
Tools (router bits and blades) must be super sharp.

Beautiful finish just with a couple of coats of oil. (I posted somewhere the coffee grinder boxes I made)

Some other info.

http://www.rarewoods.co.za/wood-browser/bubinga

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/African_rosewood

Ooops...you're right, Phil...my mistake. :oops: At least African Rosewood doesn't smell like Zebrano !



Roger, you are hi-jacking my reply! :lol: :lol: :lol: :text-threadjacked:
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Re: Grain filling

Postby RogerS » 05 Jan 2017, 15:00

Phil wrote:
Phil wrote:
RogerS wrote: They show some Bubinga (African Satinwood if you want to be posh) with unfilled grain.



We know Bubinga as African Rosewood (one of the specie)

The bits that I have used in projects have been very close grain. Nice to work with but a bastward to plane as the grain just changes direction in the middle of the plank.
Tools (router bits and blades) must be super sharp.

Beautiful finish just with a couple of coats of oil. (I posted somewhere the coffee grinder boxes I made)

Some other info.

http://www.rarewoods.co.za/wood-browser/bubinga

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/African_rosewood

Ooops...you're right, Phil...my mistake. :oops: At least African Rosewood doesn't smell like Zebrano !



Roger, you are hi-jacking my reply! :lol: :lol: :lol: :text-threadjacked:



Ooops..sorry. I do have form in this :lol: area
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