It is currently 22 Oct 2019, 07:20

Mike G's How to Build a Shed

Roll up, roll up. Here you will find everything from new workshop designs, through builds to completed workshop tours. All magnificently overseen by our own Mike G and his tremendously thorough 'Shed' design and generous advice.

Mike G's How to Build a Shed

Postby Andyp » 09 Dec 2016, 19:49

First published in 2010


Note that this only applies if your building does not require Building Regulations approval. If it needs to meet the regs, the base will need to be properly designed according to the local soil conditions and tree locations etc.



Image

The concrete should be laid on:
-clean compacted hardcore, from 75 to max. 150 thick
-sand blinding (for the protection of the DPM)
-1200 gauge DPM

Note the golden rule of walls: The Vapour Barrier goes on the warm side of the insulation!!!!. The vapour barrier in this drawing is the OSB, which is full of glue and therefore highly resistant to the passage of moisture.

Key features of this design are the brick plinth and the 25mm air gap between the frame and the back of the cladding. In the roof, it is essential that there is a 50mm clear ventilated void above the insulation, and that there is a continuous 25mm gap at the eaves (with insect mesh) to provide air movement. These features are essential to prolong the life of the building, and to keep everything inside dry.

You can omit the floating floor if you wish. My own workshop simply has the concrete slab as the floor.

I imply no structural calculations for the roof! Each roof should be designed individually, and I am always happy to help with that. I would suggest min. 150mm rafters so that you can fit 100mm of insulation in without restricting the airflow, but with some roofs the rafters will need to be much deeper for structural reasons.

The boarding can easily be replaced with render, so long as the airflow behind is maintained, and this is made easier by using a backing of building paper behind the EML (mesh) so that the render doesn't get pushed through too far into the cavity. Note that with boarding there should only be one nail per board per stud position, and that that nail should be situated about 30mm up from the bottom edge of the board.

Corner detail
3D76F88D-281D-430C-91BA-1B50AF135127.jpeg
(202.77 KiB)



And now a variation: with Timber Suspended Floor

Shedscan21600x1886.jpg
(115.14 KiB)


Mod Note: Thanks to Rod having an archive of the main drawing we have been able to re-instate this. Also thanks due to Deejay who has provided a copy of the Timber Suspended Floor sketch to reinstate Mikes original diagrams. Bob

I like this less, particularly because of the large step up and the resulting taller building (or reduced headroom). This isn't the only way to do this, but the principle is to have the insulation hard up under the flooring, with a continuous ventilated void below the joist.

The surface of the reduced ground level below the floor should either have a geotextile membrane or a layer of lime laid on it, or it should be treated with a weed-killer. Avoid using this design in wet/ boggy areas because of the reduced ground level below the floor.

I hope this helps.

Mike
Last edited by Andyp on 03 Sep 2019, 19:01, edited 1 time in total.
Reason: Image of corner detail added.
cheers

Andy
“Sometimes I sits and thinks, and sometimes I just sits...” A.A. Milne

Doing my best to achieve Wabi Sabi
User avatar
Andyp
Sequoia
 
Posts: 5874
Joined: 22 Jul 2014, 07:05
Location: 14860 Normandy, France
Name: Andy

Re: Mike G's How to Build a Shed

Postby Andyp » 09 Dec 2016, 19:59

The above was first posted on UKW in 2010 I propose to make it a sticky in due course but have left it open for the moment in case Mike wants to add anything to what are now 6 year old drawings.
cheers

Andy
“Sometimes I sits and thinks, and sometimes I just sits...” A.A. Milne

Doing my best to achieve Wabi Sabi
User avatar
Andyp
Sequoia
 
Posts: 5874
Joined: 22 Jul 2014, 07:05
Location: 14860 Normandy, France
Name: Andy

Re: Mike G's How to Build a Shed

Postby 9fingers » 15 Dec 2017, 18:32

Thanks to Deejay :eusa-clap: :eusa-clap:

We now have a copy of the Timber Suspended Floor sketch which has been edited into Mikes original post.

Bob
Image
Information on induction motors here
https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B_GZrX ... sp=sharing
Email:motors@minchin.org.uk
User avatar
9fingers
Sequoia
 
Posts: 5321
Joined: 21 Jul 2014, 20:22
Location: Romsey Hampshire between Southampton and the New Forest
Name: Bob

Re: Mike G's How to Build a Shed

Postby Dave R » 11 Oct 2019, 13:13

It's good to see this back. Thanks for fixing it up.

I'm curious about the roof. Andy, what did you use for roofing on your shed? It seems to be a common thing to have little to no overhang on the roofs of houses and sheds over there. I can understand that with a heavy tile or slate roof but if you use asphalt shingles or metal the weight wouldn't be a big problem. Having a wider overhang would provide some protection from rain and help to keep the sun out a bit in the summer months.
Dave R
Sapling
 
Posts: 456
Joined: 22 Jul 2014, 13:38
Name:

Re: Mike G's How to Build a Shed

Postby Mike G » 11 Oct 2019, 13:41

There is more than just the structure to consider when designing a building. There is also local tradition and aesthetics. Large roof overhangs just aren't something we do over here.......but as soon as Brits went to the tropics centuries ago, for instance, we developed huge roof overhangs. I don't see there is anything much to be gained by large overhangs here in the UK, but if people want to do it, then fine. Saying that, I have about a 3 foot overhang on the rear of my workshop, to create a dry wood storage area, but when it is finished it will have support posts to make it look less odd.
User avatar
Mike G
Old Oak
 
Posts: 4212
Joined: 30 Jul 2014, 22:36
Location: Somewhat less of a hovel
Name:

Re: Mike G's How to Build a Shed

Postby Dave R » 11 Oct 2019, 13:46

Yeah. I understand the tradition part of it. We do have the tradition of wider overhangs. Not like you might in the tropics. On our house the soffits are 2 feet wide. They protect the windows and doors from the rain except when it is blowing a gale. In many cases we can even have the windows open when it rains. Still, it was just a question. No intent to make anyone change their ways.
Dave R
Sapling
 
Posts: 456
Joined: 22 Jul 2014, 13:38
Name:

Re: Mike G's How to Build a Shed

Postby Mike G » 11 Oct 2019, 15:49

Whereabouts are you, Dave?
User avatar
Mike G
Old Oak
 
Posts: 4212
Joined: 30 Jul 2014, 22:36
Location: Somewhat less of a hovel
Name:

Re: Mike G's How to Build a Shed

Postby Dave R » 11 Oct 2019, 15:53

I'm in Minnesota, US.
Dave R
Sapling
 
Posts: 456
Joined: 22 Jul 2014, 13:38
Name:

Re: Mike G's How to Build a Shed

Postby Mike G » 11 Oct 2019, 16:57

Ah, right. Well you have an altogether different aesthetic, and you get snow and ice. Big roof overhangs would be a necessity rather than a bonus, I reckon.
User avatar
Mike G
Old Oak
 
Posts: 4212
Joined: 30 Jul 2014, 22:36
Location: Somewhat less of a hovel
Name:

Re: Mike G's How to Build a Shed

Postby Dave R » 11 Oct 2019, 17:14

Well, in a lot of respects they are very helpful. One downside of the longer overhangs with the snow on the roof of a heated building like a house is the formation of ice dams. If the attic space isn't well insulated, you can get snow melting and running down toward the eaves where it freezes because the overhang isn't heated. This forms a raised ridge of ice which allows water to back up under the shingles. There's a rubber membrane that gets glued down before the shingles go on to prevent water from seeping in.
Dave R
Sapling
 
Posts: 456
Joined: 22 Jul 2014, 13:38
Name:

Re: Mike G's How to Build a Shed

Postby Andyp » 11 Oct 2019, 18:21

Dave R wrote:It's good to see this back. Thanks for fixing it up.

I'm curious about the roof. Andy, what did you use for roofing on your shed?


I can see why you thought the thread was mine Dave but I have never built a shed in my life. I just edited Mike's post. :)
cheers

Andy
“Sometimes I sits and thinks, and sometimes I just sits...” A.A. Milne

Doing my best to achieve Wabi Sabi
User avatar
Andyp
Sequoia
 
Posts: 5874
Joined: 22 Jul 2014, 07:05
Location: 14860 Normandy, France
Name: Andy


Return to Workshop Builds

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Bing [Bot] and 1 guest