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Chainsaw?

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Chainsaw?

Postby Woodbloke » 16 May 2019, 10:09

SWIMBO and I are going round this morning to see one of her pals who has a Walnut tree that needs to come down. Providing the tree is suitable, I said I would revert to the 'dark side' and turn up a bowl for her, but in order to do so, I need to chop it into suitable chunks. I've seen this one which consistently seems to get excellent reviews, but what do the rest of you chaps reckon, who know a lot more about these beasties than I do?

What also is the most comfortable sized chunk of wood I could go through with this sized saw? It appears that electrickery saws don't come any larger either.

Any guidance/tips/ticks etc gratefully received as this is a completely new area for me - Rob
Last edited by Woodbloke on 16 May 2019, 14:08, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Chainsaw?

Postby StevieB » 16 May 2019, 12:43

Why not just hire one? Much more robust and probably cheaper - assuming you only want it for this one off job?

I have a Titan one from Screwfix for odd jobs and to be honest, the difference is in the chain rather than the saw - put a decent aftermarket chain on it and a poor tool becomes much better - these are hardly precision instruments. :D
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Re: Chainsaw?

Postby Woodster » 16 May 2019, 13:13

I’d get someone else to do it Rob. By the time you buy a face shield and safety trousers etc it’s going to be a couple of hundred quid.
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Re: Chainsaw?

Postby Mike G » 16 May 2019, 14:05

I'm with Woodster on this one. However, if you do see a use for a chainsaw into the future, then Stihl, Stihl, Stihl. And they can handle whatever twice the length of the guide bar........so a 12" saw can cut down a 24" diameter tree, at a pinch.

As for guidance.......

.........never work above shoulder level. Never work without 2 firmly planted feet. Take extreme care of pinching. Blade re-sharpening is constant. Never use a chainsaw to cut the thin brushy stuff out of the way of the cut you are trying for. Learn chain tensioning PDQ. Keep the oil levels high, and don't cut into the ground. Be absolutely certain that every cut is clear of steel (nails, staples and barbed wire in trunks are a real danger). Never let anyone stand within 10 feet of you with a chainsaw in your hand, and never let anyone come up behind you when you are sawing. Treat the thing as the most lethal tool you've ever picked up......because it is.
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Re: Chainsaw?

Postby Woodbloke » 16 May 2019, 14:16

Woodster wrote:I’d get someone else to do it Rob. By the time you buy a face shield and safety trousers etc it’s going to be a couple of hundred quid.

It's actually being taken down by a professional tree surgeon, but I could use the electric chain saw to chop off smaller lumps.

IMG_2849.jpg
(347.04 KiB)


The tree itself seems to be in poor condition as it's had most of it's branches lopped off over the decades; I guess it was planted pre War in the garden of a 1930's house, but it's now big and too close to the garage, being liable to interfere with the foundations, so it's coming out. The butt is around two metres and clear but there's quite a lot more useful timber.
The spaniard in the works is that access to it is rather limited :cry: If I can't sort out a way of converting it and/or using smaller bits, it's all going to go up in flames!

Edit - thanks Mike, 'tis what I thought about them. SWIMBO is unhappy about the purchase, so that idea has been kicked into the long grass - Rob
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Re: Chainsaw?

Postby Woodbloke » 16 May 2019, 15:03

I've put wheels in motion to get it slabbed up on site which will enable the owner to make a few spondulicos on the deal; I'll also get a slab or two at 'preferential' :eusa-whistle: rates - Rob
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Re: Chainsaw?

Postby Woodbloke » 18 May 2019, 16:05

Things are moving along nicely with the proposed walnut tree conversion. As the owner is an old pal of SWIMBO's I've been 'requested' :eusa-whistle: to make something for her (the owner) using a few bits and piece from the branches above the main butt. The items will hopefully be a couple of bowls and a box.
Now that the idea of a chainsaw has been kicked into the long grass, I've been researching the idea of using a froe and mallet (or beetle) to rive suitable slabs into useable material. I've been looking at a lot of UToob clips and it seems to be a pretty versatile bit of kit. I've also considered getting hold of the Japanese green wood saw from WH in lieu of a chainsaw...but how to sharpen the teeth when they get blunt?
Opinions and thoughts? - Rob
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Re: Chainsaw?

Postby Andyp » 18 May 2019, 16:43

Assuming that the Jap saw linked to is crosscut will you also need a large rip saw to make your slabs?

As the wood will still be wet and soft it should stay sharp for a while.
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Re: Chainsaw?

Postby Woodbloke » 18 May 2019, 16:56

Andyp wrote:Assuming that the Jap saw linked to is crosscut will you also need a large rip saw to make your slabs?

As the wood will still be wet and soft it should stay sharp for a while.

That's what the froe is for Andy; hopefully stuff can be riven along the grain rather than cut - Rob
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Re: Chainsaw?

Postby Mike G » 18 May 2019, 19:42

Riving of course is dependent on grain direction, so you need to hope for relatively well behaved grain.
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Re: Chainsaw?

Postby Woodbloke » 18 May 2019, 20:48

Mike G wrote:Riving of course is dependent on grain direction, so you need to hope for relatively well behaved grain.

Agreed Mike, but from my UToobing studies today it appears that many timbers seem to cleave well and it's surprising how accurate you can get with a little practice. Walnut is one of those that will cleave easily; elm I suspect won't - Rob
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Re: Chainsaw?

Postby Woodster » 18 May 2019, 21:34

A Froe could come in handy and they do make using one look easy on YouTube.
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Re: Chainsaw?

Postby woodstalker » 29 May 2019, 09:16

Woodbloke wrote:I've put wheels in motion to get it slabbed up on site which will enable the owner to make a few spondulicos on the deal; I'll also get a slab or two at 'preferential' :eusa-whistle: rates - Rob


Rob, who did you find locally to slab the trunk? I’ve got a similar problem with a medium size beech and was wondering about hiring a chainsaw mill if I could find one to rent. Much better to get someone to do it for me, less risk of my limbs being removed!

Thanks

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Re: Chainsaw?

Postby Woodbloke » 29 May 2019, 17:16

woodstalker wrote:
Rob, who did you find locally to slab the trunk? I’ve got a similar problem with a medium size beech and was wondering about hiring a chainsaw mill if I could find one to rent. Much better to get someone to do it for me, less risk of my limbs being removed!

Thanks

James

It's not my tree James but the whole log was bought by Paul Goulden who has a chap coming up from Cornwall next week to slab it up. It promises to be an interesting day, providing the weather holds :eusa-pray:

Edit: I see you're in Amesbury which is only about fifteen minutes from me...feel free to drop over for a natter and brew. PM me if you would like to sort out a day? - Rob
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Re: Chainsaw?

Postby woodstalker » 29 May 2019, 17:40

Woodbloke wrote:
woodstalker wrote:
Rob, who did you find locally to slab the trunk? I’ve got a similar problem with a medium size beech and was wondering about hiring a chainsaw mill if I could find one to rent. Much better to get someone to do it for me, less risk of my limbs being removed!

Thanks

James

It's not my tree James but the whole log was bought by Paul Goulden who has a chap coming up from Cornwall next week to slab it up. It promises to be an interesting day, providing the weather holds :eusa-pray:

Edit: I see you're in Amesbury which is only about fifteen minutes from me...feel free to drop over for a natter and brew. PM me if you would like to sort out a day? - Rob


Hi Rob,

Thanks for the reply, let me know how the slabbing goes. I’d be interested to see how it can be done.

Also I love a cup of tea, I’m working away until the end of August so maybe then? I warn you I am still very much a novice but would love to see some of the pieces you’ve made and related to us all on the forum.

All the best, James
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Re: Chainsaw?

Postby Andyp » 29 May 2019, 17:50

Careful James, you can swim it what passes for a tea cup in Rob's house. :)
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Re: Chainsaw?

Postby Woodbloke » 29 May 2019, 18:04

Andyp wrote:Careful James, you can swim it what passes for a tea cup in Rob's house. :)

I hope you're not incinerating Andy, that there's something wrong with my pint Union Flag mug? :lol: - Rob
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Re: Chainsaw?

Postby Woodbloke » 29 May 2019, 18:06

woodstalker wrote:Thanks for the reply, let me know how the slabbing goes. I’d be interested to see how it can be done.

Also I love a cup of tea, I’m working away until the end of August so maybe then? I warn you I am still very much a novice but would love to see some of the pieces you’ve made and related to us all on the forum.

All the best, James

Great, we can sort something out for the end of August and pics will be forthcoming on 'slabbing day' - Rob
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Re: Chainsaw?

Postby woodstalker » 30 May 2019, 17:16

Woodbloke wrote:
woodstalker wrote:Thanks for the reply, let me know how the slabbing goes. I’d be interested to see how it can be done.

Also I love a cup of tea, I’m working away until the end of August so maybe then? I warn you I am still very much a novice but would love to see some of the pieces you’ve made and related to us all on the forum.

All the best, James

Great, we can sort something out for the end of August and pics will be forthcoming on 'slabbing day' - Rob


Had a bloke round today who reshaped the crown of an ash I have in the garden. He’s going to remove the beech plus he has his own chainsaw mill so can slab the trunk for me. Bonus all round; you never know by the time it dries and is usable I may have the skills to match the wood!

PS I grew up on a farm and way back I used to be a builder’s labourer so a mug is all I know for tea.
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