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New roof.

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New roof.

Postby MY63 » 22 May 2020, 09:28

We live in a 1930's semi and our roof is looking its age. The last time our roofer did repairs he said the tiles were brittle and we should be thinking about replacing the roof in the next 5 years.
As he was planning on retiring I tended to believe what he said.
The existing roof is rosemary tiles and they look great but I understand they are expensive. My sister lives next door and is considering having her side done at the same time, So at least if we went with a different tile it would not look as bad as some of our neighbours. Some have used tiles that look twice as thick as rosemary's and they look terrible, almost as bad as the ones who have used black tiles.
Any advice appreciated.
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Re: New roof.

Postby jeremyduncombe14 » 22 May 2020, 10:15

When we bought our house, the surveyor said that the whole roof would need replacing soon. That was 32 years ago. Over that time we have replaced about a quarter of the roof tiles and battens, but none of the underlying woodwork. We also replace the occasional slipped tile as soon as we notice it. I expect the roof will still be keeping the rain out long after I am gone.
Unless you are already seeing wholesale failure of the tiles, I would leave well alone.
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Re: New roof.

Postby Mike G » 22 May 2020, 15:52

I know of the Rosemary plain tile. It's clay. Is that the one?

My personal view on this is that too many rooves are replaced too soon. If there aren't multiple breakages and/ or tiles dropping off willy nilly, I'd leave it. Clay plain tiles 400 years old can still make a perfectly good roof.
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Re: New roof.

Postby MY63 » 22 May 2020, 17:41

As far as I know they are rosemary clay tiles.
The old roofer told me every time he replaced a tile he was replacing the two either side of it as they were breaking.
I have the name of a trusted roofer so I am going to give him a call and see what he says.

Image2019-03-26_03-08-37 by my0771, on Flickr

Picture might help
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Re: New roof.

Postby Woodbloke » 24 May 2020, 09:01

Our house was built in 1947 just after the war and there seemed to be a distinct shortage of cement at the time as there was nothing :o between the ridge tiles on the roof except fresh air! The back South facing wall had also been scoured by wind and was badly in need of re-pointing, so we had both done by a reputable local firm a couple of years ago.
We also had one of the chimney's taken out (as it was wonky) and the other one re-pointed at the same time. The roofer mentioned that the;

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...lower roof (over the water butt) had been leaking for the last 80 odd years as there was no lead flashing; the builders had used a fillet of cement to try and make it watertight. As a consequence, the timbers underneath were rotten and had to be replaced; that section of the roof had dropped by around 30mm!
It was an expensive little exercise to get done and we had to wait a year for the roofing company to do it but it was ultimately very well worthwhile - Rob
I no longer work for Axminster Tools & Machinery.
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New roof.

Postby TrimTheKing » 24 May 2020, 09:42

Not all ridges need pointing Rob, might be worth checking you weren’t ripped off...
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Re: New roof.

Postby Woodbloke » 24 May 2020, 11:21

TrimTheKing wrote:Not all ridges need pointing Rob, might be worth checking you weren’t ripped off...

Most of houses in the road that had original roofs have still got their pointing in the ridges; ours was the only one that didn't, so it needed to be done. If you read about all the other ailments that needed sorting out, we certainly weren't 'ripped off' and we consider for the excellent job done, it was rather good value for money - Rob
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Re: New roof.

Postby TrimTheKing » 24 May 2020, 11:32

Fairy snuff.


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Re: New roof.

Postby Malc2098 » 24 May 2020, 11:43

Woodbloke wrote:Most of houses in the road that had original roofs have still got their pointing in the ridges; ours was the only one that didn't, so it needed to be done. If you read about all the other ailments that needed sorting out, we certainly weren't 'ripped off' and we consider for the excellent job done, it was rather good value for money - Rob


I lived in a house built after the war in a road full of council houses. The builder built the whole road. Mine, one of a pair of semis, was private at the time of build, and was nowhere near the the standard of construction of the rest of the council houses. E.g. you could rub the mortar away with your finger, but not on all the other houses. So the builder got his bunch by throwing up the two private houses after building the council houses to the required standard.
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Re: New roof.

Postby Woodbloke » 24 May 2020, 12:39

Malc2098 wrote: The builder built the whole road. Mine, one of a pair of semis, was private at the time of build, and was nowhere near the the standard of construction of the rest of the council houses.

This one's an ex-council property and apparently the estate was built to house the Earl of Pembroke's workers, who's stately gaff is just down the road in Wilton. Apart from the weak mortar mix in the south wall and the cement rendering on roof instead of proper lead flashing, it's built like the proverbial 'out' house :lol: so much so that you very rarely see them up for sale - Rob
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