• Hi all and welcome to TheWoodHaven2 brought into the 21st Century, kicking and screaming! We all have Alasdair to thank for the vast bulk of the heavy lifting to get us here, no more so than me because he's taken away a huge burden of responsibility from my shoulders and brought us to this new shiny home, with all your previous content (hopefully) still intact! Please peruse and feed back. There is still plenty to do, like changing the colour scheme, adding the banner graphic, tweaking the odd setting here and there so I have added a new thread in the 'Technical Issues, Bugs and Feature Requests' forum for you to add any issues you find, any missing settings or just anything you'd like to see added/removed from the feature set that Xenforo offers. We will get to everything over the coming weeks so please be patient, but add anything at all to the thread I mention above and we promise to get to them over the next few days/weeks/months. In the meantime, please enjoy!

Hand Tool Storage

duke

New Shoots
Joined
Dec 18, 2020
Messages
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Location
Field, Ontario, Canada
L1000001682.jpg1000001690.jpg1000001691.jpg1000001685.jpg1000001686.jpg1000001687.jpg1000001689.jpgLet's See Your Hand Tool Storage as per nudge from Mike G.
Yea, I need to label doors and drawers otherwise I can't find anything.
 
I like the utilitarian nature of that, Duke. It looks like a working space, rather than a showroom. I like those cranked paring gouges.
 
And actual real live dust —a working workshop, you’re to be congratulated Duke.
You don’t see much of that in a lot of the tool collectors displays that pass for workshops particularly on YouTube, it makes me think a lot of our American friends must be extremely tidy lol.
Ian
 
And actual real live dust —a working workshop, you’re to be congratulated Duke.
You don’t see much of that in a lot of the tool collectors displays that pass for workshops particularly on YouTube, it makes me think a lot of our American friends must be extremely tidy lol.
Ian
Ha ha, the shop was relatively clean last night of the pic. Now its messy. With the ceiling air scrubber and dust collection system in use dust is somewhat controlled. I only buy tools that I need. I understand the draw of collecting.
 
And actual real live dust —a working workshop, you’re to be congratulated Duke.
You don’t see much of that in a lot of the tool collectors displays that pass for workshops particularly on YouTube, it makes me think a lot of our American friends must be extremely tidy lol.
Ian
I don't know if it's an American trait to keep a tidy shop, but it is certainly my goal. 😊 My shop is not a separate building, but is part of the living space in our house. I try to eliminate, or at least minimize, the amount of dust, chips, and noise that escape from my shop and filter through the rest of the house.

When I take photos of an ongoing work in progress, I clean up around the project and remove anything that might distract from the subject. Otherwise, I let the chips fall where they may, and tidy up when I take a break, but always leave a clean shop when I am finished for the day. This lifelong habit surprised the late David Charlesworth when I attended the first of his courses. After he left at the end of the first day, I tidied up my bench and cleaned up the rest of the shop, as I do at home. It was apparent that some areas had not been cleaned for a long time.

Last year, I shared some photos on the Festool Owners Group of the modifications I made to my spindle moulder. A UK member commented on the tidy shop and added he had better things to do in his shop than polishing his tools. I suppose this is a inverse of the classic method of identifying a king that can be used to identify a real woodworker, and not a pretender. :rolleyes:
 
OSB was used on my workshop walls. Painting them white really helps with the light. A bit hard to do that once the furniture is in though.
 
I don't know if it's an American trait to keep a tidy shop, but it is certainly my goal. 😊 My shop is not a separate building, but is part of the living space in our house. I try to eliminate, or at least minimize, the amount of dust, chips, and noise that escape from my shop and filter through the rest of the house.

When I take photos of an ongoing work in progress, I clean up around the project and remove anything that might distract from the subject. Otherwise, I let the chips fall where they may, and tidy up when I take a break, but always leave a clean shop when I am finished for the day. This lifelong habit surprised the late David Charlesworth when I attended the first of his courses. After he left at the end of the first day, I tidied up my bench and cleaned up the rest of the shop, as I do at home. It was apparent that some areas had not been cleaned for a long time.

Last year, I shared some photos on the Festool Owners Group of the modifications I made to my spindle moulder. A UK member commented on the tidy shop and added he had better things to do in his shop than polishing his tools. I suppose this is a inverse of the classic method of identifying a king that can be used to identify a real woodworker, and not a pretender. :rolleyes:
Nothing wrong with keeping your shop clean seeing that it is not stand alone. The dust can get into everything. I usually tidy up in the mornings.
 
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