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Saws

Here's the place to talk about all your table saws, bandsaws, routers and dust extractors. In fact anything that makes noise and uses electrickery.

Re: Saws

Postby novocaine » 04 Aug 2022, 17:42

Raymedullary wrote:Ok but please do not use it to cut rebates as alluded to above! Burying the blade is a H&S no no on a TS. Unless it's a rabbet hehe.


No it's not.
WIS 16 says its fine with suitable guarding.
It's another of those statements that's been tooted for years but simply isn't correct.
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Re: Saws

Postby Raymedullary » 04 Aug 2022, 18:16

Oh dear, I'm out of date! It was the case in the late 70's when I was taught.
No "tooting" going on here.
I still wouldn't do it though.
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Re: Saws

Postby novocaine » 04 Aug 2022, 18:46

Raymedullary wrote:Oh dear, I'm out of date! It was the case in the late 70's when I was taught.
No "tooting" going on here.
I still wouldn't do it though.


Sorry, its one of bugbears. Didn't mean for it to sound so snippy. :obscene-drinkingcheers:
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Re: Saws

Postby Raymedullary » 04 Aug 2022, 18:49

Hey no worries :D . We both have all our fingers (I assume)
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Re: Saws

Postby Trevanion » 04 Aug 2022, 19:46

Woodbloke wrote:Ahem....I did say that even a small one would probably be too big for the average small 'shop (say medium single garage size of 15sq metres, according to Google) They're great, but just tooooooo big for most users - Rob


I think I would still have the sliding table saw pretty much over any other tool in a small workshop aside from a planer thicknesser, it’s not so much about which tool is better than the other but which is more relevant and versatile for the work behind undertaken which sound primarily joinery. You could quite easily fit a smallish one in a small single garage-sized workshop and it also doubles up as a decent assembly bench if you take the guard off, wind the blade to underneath the table and place a piece of plywood atop it.

Raymedullary wrote:Ok but please do not use it to cut rebates as alluded to above! Burying the blade is a H&S no no on a TS. Unless it's a rabbet hehe.


As Novocaine said, it’s not a H&S no-no and the HSE actually illustrate it in their document on using circular saw benches, though I do think there is still some ruling that the safest machine should be used for the task, so if you have a spindle moulder you should use that rather than the table saw, but some rebates are actually safer cut on the table saw than the spindle moulder. I will quite often take the rebates out on short sections of sashes/casements as they’re quite dangerous to feed through a spindle moulder but ripping the rebate out is a fairly safe operation.
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Re: Saws

Postby Woodbloke » 05 Aug 2022, 18:41

Trevanion wrote:
I think I would still have the sliding table saw pretty much over any other tool in a small workshop aside from a planer thicknesser, it’s not so much about which tool is better than the other but which is more relevant and versatile for the work behind undertaken which sound primarily joinery. You could quite easily fit a smallish one in a small single garage-sized workshop and it also doubles up as a decent assembly bench if you take the guard off, wind the blade to underneath the table and place a piece of plywood atop it.



I had two small tablesaurs with sliding tables (Kity 419 and an appalling Charnwood thing) in my 'shop which took up an inordinate amount of space which was at the time intensely annoying as I never really used the things as they were intended. They were also incredibly inaccurate which was even more annoying :evil: ! Eventually, they both got sold on and the space they once occupied is now taken up with a UJK, cast iron topped router table which is infinitely more useful for the sort of work I do. Tablesaurs of any denomination I don't need! - Rob
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Re: Saws

Postby novocaine » 05 Aug 2022, 20:16

turns out that opinions on saws are like *. we all have one. no one else needs to know about yours and no one likes the taste of it.
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Re: Saws

Postby Trevanion » 05 Aug 2022, 20:38

Woodbloke wrote:
Trevanion wrote:
I think I would still have the sliding table saw pretty much over any other tool in a small workshop aside from a planer thicknesser, it’s not so much about which tool is better than the other but which is more relevant and versatile for the work behind undertaken which sound primarily joinery. You could quite easily fit a smallish one in a small single garage-sized workshop and it also doubles up as a decent assembly bench if you take the guard off, wind the blade to underneath the table and place a piece of plywood atop it.



I had two small tablesaurs with sliding tables (Kity 419 and an appalling Charnwood thing) in my 'shop which took up an inordinate amount of space which was at the time intensely annoying as I never really used the things as they were intended. They were also incredibly inaccurate which was even more annoying :evil: ! Eventually, they both got sold on and the space they once occupied is now taken up with a UJK, cast iron topped router table which is infinitely more useful for the sort of work I do. Tablesaurs of any denomination I don't need! - Rob


I'm not sure if you're getting my point, Rob :eusa-think:
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Re: Saws

Postby Woodbloke » 06 Aug 2022, 09:17

Trevanion wrote:
I'm not sure if you're getting my point, Rob :eusa-think:

I can see where you're coming from, but for the sort of work I do, tablesaurs don't work for me and I've developed a way of working where I simply don't need one; end of story :D - Rob
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Re: Saws

Postby Trevanion » 06 Aug 2022, 10:05

Woodbloke wrote:I can see where you're coming from, but for the sort of work I do, tablesaurs don't work for me and I've developed a way of working where I simply don't need one; end of story :D - Rob


Yes, but this discussion isn't about you but rather the OP, Windows, who's looking to make doors and windows and other home improvement items, rather than high-end cabinetry with super tight tolerances. Working exclusively with a bandsaw may work perfectly well for you doing that, but I personally don't believe it is the ideal choice for the work being undertaken and that the euro-style sliding table saw is the better choice of the two because of its versatility.

I made this large triangular window for a conservatory a little while back, I don't think there's another faster, safer (well if I had the guard on it would be safer :oops:), and more accurate way of making these acute cuts, and that's just one of its numerous uses.

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Even in a tiny workshop I would still make room for one above all else (aside from a planer thicknesser) because I can live without most things but I would really struggle without the sliding table saw.
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Re: Saws

Postby 9fingers » 06 Aug 2022, 10:14

Woodbloke wrote:I can see where you're coming from, but for the sort of work I do, tablesaurs don't work for me and I've developed a way of working where I simply don't need one; end of story :D - Rob


Agreed this is the whole point. Most of us have established our favoured ways of working to suit the type of projects we do.
As far as the OP question is concerned they could perhaps sit down an mentally work through the type of jobs they want to do and think how the various major tools would work for them.
Hopefully home in on a primary sawing machine and give that a try in practice. Maybe it will be a right first time or perhaps they will go through the evolution process as Rob did of investing in a tablesaw, not getting on with it and ending up with two bandsaws instead.
I bought a RAS when setting up thinking I'd use it a lot and in 15 years it's rarely made any sawdust - we can all make errors unless extremely lucky.

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