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Re: Workshop Uses for 3D Printing

PostPosted: 23 Apr 2022, 13:13
by Dr.Al
A radius gauge set downloaded from printables:

radius_gauge_set.jpg
(50.82 KiB)


radius_gauge_set_closeup.jpg
(95.91 KiB)


The case was a bit of a chore to print (needed supports, but supports were hard to remove) and one of the hinges broke the first time I tried to close the case, but it still seems to do the job.

Re: Workshop Uses for 3D Printing

PostPosted: 24 Apr 2022, 15:43
by Dr.Al
Storage for Makita batteries:

makita_battery_holders.jpg
(28.28 KiB)


The weird cut-out thing is because the design was pinched from my cordless vacuum starter thing, which has the cut-out for the connector block. Didn't seem worth the effort of changing the design when the hole does no harm.

They're mounted on the bottom of one of my (many) french-cleat-attached ceiling-joist-mounted stuff-holders:

makita_battery_holders_on_ceiling.jpg
(35.61 KiB)

Re: Workshop Uses for 3D Printing

PostPosted: 24 Apr 2022, 17:32
by Andyp
That colour is much easier on my eye than the purple you showed us earlier.

Great stuff.

Re: Workshop Uses for 3D Printing

PostPosted: 25 Apr 2022, 13:43
by Dr.Al
Andyp wrote:That colour is much easier on my eye than the purple you showed us earlier.


I agree with you. Unfortunately it's one of the more expensive filaments (just because of the particular brand) and the options for relatively muted colours seem to be a bit limited.

Re: Workshop Uses for 3D Printing

PostPosted: 26 Apr 2022, 18:12
by Dr.Al
A while ago, I inherited this drill set (including the drills):

empty_drill_set.jpg
(44.69 KiB)


I can't think of any likely situations in which I'll need a 1/4" or 7/16" drill bit, but there are times when an 11.1 mm drill bit (which happens to be 7/16") could be handy as I don't have that size in any of my metric sets. To save me having to consult my big table, I printed this little holder for the drill set:

full_drill_set_1.jpg
(39.01 KiB)


full_drill_set_2.jpg
(41.54 KiB)


wo decimal places is probably a bit ridiculous for a drill bit, but I figured it didn't hurt. Ideally I would have made it a little bit smaller, but getting very small 3D-printable text can be a bit of a challenge without a nozzle change and I wanted to make life easy.

Re: Workshop Uses for 3D Printing

PostPosted: 27 Apr 2022, 16:58
by Dr.Al
There's something quite satisfying about coming home from work to find things sitting on the printer...

Today I got home to these:

chuck_jaw_mount_on_bench.jpg
(45.1 KiB)


and this:

corner_chisel_mount_on_bench.jpg
(45.33 KiB)


The latter has a weird shaped hole to help wall-mount a corner chisel:

corner_chisel_mount.jpg
(36.66 KiB)


The former hangs on the front of my lathe and gives me somewhere to store the two sets of chuck jaws that aren't in the chuck at any point:

chuck_jaw_mount.jpg
(38.73 KiB)

Re: Workshop Uses for 3D Printing

PostPosted: 27 Apr 2022, 17:51
by novocaine
I'm not sure this is workshop related. :lol:

20220427_175009.jpg
(307.64 KiB)

Re: Workshop Uses for 3D Printing

PostPosted: 28 May 2022, 20:37
by novocaine
20220528_203015.jpg
(193.66 KiB)


So here's part of the reason i went cheaper but still good. Today I retrofitted autobed leveling for the grand total of 13 quid. Along with a glass bed from an old IKEA mirror. I could have bought an ender or similar for more money to get these features but then I wouldn't have had this fun. I'm now thinking a different hotend, again I wouldn't have dared on a more expensive machine (I don't need a different hotend, but I can fit one that will make parts cheaper in the future).

Re: Workshop Uses for 3D Printing

PostPosted: 06 Jul 2022, 16:03
by Mike G
Dr Al,

could you give me a little guidance, please. I have a project in mind which would need need some parts making on a 3d printer, and before I design them I want to know what limits I am designing within. On a set-up like yours, what is the maximum size of the piece you can make? Is it possible to have "shapes" on all faces, or is it necessary to have something flat-ish on the bottom? One of the things I have in mind needs to be pretty strong, so is it feasible to have flat parts made up in thicknesses of 8 or 10mm, say?

Thanks for any help you can give.

Re: Workshop Uses for 3D Printing

PostPosted: 06 Jul 2022, 16:26
by Robert
Mike, I'll leave specific answers to others but just wanted to point out you can play with 3D printing without having to buy a printer.

Download and install cura which is a free 'slicing' program. It converts your model into printing layers and more importantly for you can show you what will work.

https://ultimaker.com/software/ultimaker-cura

You will have to tell it what printer to prepare files for just choose one. Mine is a Ender 3 V2.

Your drawing program needs to export .stl files for cura to slice.

You can also download other peoples models from places like thingyverse to see how they slice.

Re: Workshop Uses for 3D Printing

PostPosted: 06 Jul 2022, 16:27
by Dr.Al
Mike G wrote:Dr Al,

could you give me a little guidance, please. I have a project in mind which would need need some parts making on a 3d printer, and before I design them I want to know what limits I am designing within. On a set-up like yours, what is the maximum size of the piece you can make? Is it possible to have "shapes" on all faces, or is it necessary to have something flat-ish on the bottom? One of the things I have in mind needs to be pretty strong, so is it feasible to have flat parts made up in thicknesses of 8 or 10mm, say?

Thanks for any help you can give.


Hi Mike

The build area for my printer is 250x200x200 if memory serves me correctly (200 high).

You can have shapes on all faces, but the finish won't be as good if the bottom isn't largely flat. It's hard to generalise, but if an edge tapers at about 50° from horizontal, it'll be okay. If it's a shallow taper or a surface that's "floating" above the build plate, the finish will suffer a bit. For small "floating areas", the printer will bridge the gap (which leaves a rough finish but is easy); for bigger areas supports are needed and those supports need removing afterwards.

If there's minimal contact with the bed, it can affect adhesion, but there are ways of dealing with that (printing a "brim" around the contact points that is cut off later).

You can print big thick areas, but it's a bit of a waste of plastic. The usual approach would be to print a few layers around the outside & print some form of infill in the middle. As I understand it, the strength of an infilled component isn't that different to a solid. There's a useful article on this topic here: https://help.prusa3d.com/article/infill-patterns_177130

It's hard to come up with hard & fast rules, but feel free to send me a sketch & I'll see if I can be more specific. If email is easier my address is al@ my domain without the www bit. I'll trust you can figure the last bit out!

Re: Workshop Uses for 3D Printing

PostPosted: 06 Jul 2022, 17:53
by Mike G
Thanks guys........very useful. At the moment these are just pencil sketches, and various scattered thoughts in my brain. I'll narrow in on things in the next week or two, and may then send an email, Dr Al.

Re: Workshop Uses for 3D Printing

PostPosted: 06 Jul 2022, 18:13
by Dr.Al
Mike G wrote:Thanks guys........very useful. At the moment these are just pencil sketches, and various scattered thoughts in my brain. I'll narrow in on things in the next week or two, and may then send an email, Dr Al.


Image

Re: Workshop Uses for 3D Printing

PostPosted: 06 Jul 2022, 18:32
by Dr.Al
Mike G wrote:Thanks guys........very useful. At the moment these are just pencil sketches, and various scattered thoughts in my brain. I'll narrow in on things in the next week or two, and may then send an email, Dr Al.


It's probably also worth mentioning that if you want something to be strong, it'll be much stronger if the the strength needs to be across a layer. For example, if you were printing something out that's a simple cuboid, 100 mm long with a 30 x 5 mm cross section and you plan to mount it at one end of the 100 mm length and hang stuff off the other end, it'll be strongest if you print it flat on the bed rather than standing upright. Layer-to-layer adhesion isn't anywhere near as good as along-the-extruded-filament adhesion if that makes sense.

Re: Workshop Uses for 3D Printing

PostPosted: 06 Jul 2022, 18:48
by Mike G
Lots of L-shapes involved with stiffness required in both directions, so this would need a good think.

Re: Workshop Uses for 3D Printing

PostPosted: 06 Jul 2022, 18:52
by Dr.Al
Mike G wrote:Lots of L-shapes involved with stiffness required in both directions, so this would need a good think.


Well, you've got two strong directions: it's only the third that's a bit weaker (although strong in compression).

Sometimes it is based to make parts in multiple pieces to get the best orientation & then fix them together.

Re: Workshop Uses for 3D Printing

PostPosted: 07 Jul 2022, 17:06
by Dr.Al
These bits:

bits_on_the_bed.jpg
(46.24 KiB)


Which turned into this perpendicular drilling jig:

pillar.jpg
(55.34 KiB)


The design calls for some springs which I haven't added yet. I'll have a play with it and see whether I think they're necessary. I don't think I'm going to throw away the pillar drill any time soon, but it could be handy for some situations. The depth stop works a lot better than I thought it would.

Link to the design (not mine) if anyone's interested: https://www.printables.com/model/217743 ... illing-jig

Re: Workshop Uses for 3D Printing

PostPosted: 22 Jul 2022, 21:07
by Dr.Al
My new bandsaw has a very neat cam-action blade tensioning thing so that it's easy to take the tension off the blade when not in use and then get it back to the same tension again. While that's a great idea, it introduces a risk of me forgetting to tension the blade before starting the motor.

Hopefully this will help:

tension_back.jpg
(20.69 KiB)


tension_front.jpg
(26.79 KiB)


It goes here:

start_stop.jpg
(36.84 KiB)


Like this (held on with magnets):

start_stop_covered.jpg
(32.11 KiB)

Re: Workshop Uses for 3D Printing

PostPosted: 22 Jul 2022, 21:18
by Malc2098
Nice.

Re: Workshop Uses for 3D Printing

PostPosted: 22 Jul 2022, 21:26
by Cabinetman
Now you just need another one that covers up the workshop keys to remind you to release the tension before you lock up haha. Ian

Re: Workshop Uses for 3D Printing

PostPosted: 22 Jul 2022, 22:56
by novocaine
Car related rather than workshop but thing no. 2 complained of excessive hair movement.

Re: Workshop Uses for 3D Printing

PostPosted: 23 Jul 2022, 07:29
by Dr.Al
Cabinetman wrote:Now you just need another one that covers up the workshop keys to remind you to release the tension before you lock up haha. Ian


:text-lol:

Re: Workshop Uses for 3D Printing

PostPosted: 23 Jul 2022, 09:46
by Dr.Al
Another fairly quick print. I've no doubt these would be quite easy to make out of (4.75 mm thick!) wood, but 3D printing them was easy and used about 80p's worth of filament for three inserts, so a lot better than paying Record £14 each:

throat_inserts_800.jpg
(72.35 KiB)


throat_insert_fitted_800.jpg
(25.93 KiB)


All printed with 100% infill. I figured with 100% infill I could cut the solid one with the bandsaw blade to make a zero clearance insert if I need one.

Re: Workshop Uses for 3D Printing

PostPosted: 23 Jul 2022, 15:22
by Lurker

Re: Workshop Uses for 3D Printing

PostPosted: 23 Jul 2022, 16:17
by Dr.Al
Lurker wrote:Saw this and thought of you :D

https://www.eztension.com/buy-one-now/e ... sion-gauge


Intriguing idea, although I'm not sure it's really necessary...